Black Nationalism

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 169
  • Published : July 13, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
Lindsay 1
Nena Lindsay
Ms Cassandra Allen
ENC 1102
November 5, 2009
Black Nationalism and Dee/Wangero
Black Nationalism is the name given to empower movements among black Americans, emphasizing their African origins and identity, their pride in being black, their desire to control their own communities, and sometimes the desire to establish a black nation in Africa or some part of the United States. An examination of the roots of these movements and of the beliefs, strategies, and goals of each will show how they were connected and how they influence the appearance, behavior, and attitudes of Dee/Wangero. Throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, black people were faced with the very grim prospect of social, economic and political oppression in society. It is at this point that the issues of Black Nationalism arise. Wilson Moses states that the concept of Black Nationalism in both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries were based first on a “subject” people under political, social and cultural domination. It also represent the desire to unite disunited people, attempt to unify politically all of those people whether they are residents of African territories or descendants of those Africans who were disposed by the slave trade. (Moses, 1978:17). In the mid-1960’s, the optimism of the Southern civil rights movements collapsed in the face of white indifference. It was the decade many African Americans remember most for the dramatic changes following the Civil Rights Movement that brought opportunities and growth both individually and collectively. At that time Dee/Wangero was but a child and knew not of Lindsay 2 what was going on. She would later know the significance of her role in life. Even as a child Dee/Wangero knew there is more to life than living in a...
tracking img