Billy Elliot

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BILLY ELLIOT

Film Metalanguage
Juxtapositioning – the organisation of scenes so that their differences made comment – eg. gloomy interior of the Elliot kitchen and the light and grace of the Ballet School auditorium Motif – the reception of an image (or piece of music) throughout a text contribute meaning to the work eg doors in Billy Elliot Segue – the imperceptible movement from once scene to another Mise-en-scene – French term – putting into the scene – the composition of a scene or shot eg the Elliot’s kitchen details, lighting tell a lot about the family life Establishing sequence – the opening moments of a film – introduces themes, characters, setting mood Reaction shot – generally a close-up of a character reacting to someone or something Proxemic range:

 Intimate distance (extreme close shots): ranges from skin contact to about eighteen inches away. This is the distance of physical movement – of love, comfort, and tenderness between individuals. Personal distance (medium close shot): Ranges roughly from eighteen inches to about four feet away. This distance tends to be reversed for friends and acquaintances rather than lovers or members of a family. Social distance (medium and full shot): Ranges from four feet to about twelve feet. These are the distances usually reserved for impersonal business and casual social gatherings. Public distance (extreme long shot): Extend from twelve feet to twenty five feet and more. This range tends to be formal and rathe detached. Displays of emotion are considered bad form at these distances. The more distance between the camera and the subject the less emotionally attached Framing – defines the scope of the shot – can emphasis relationships by shooting 2 people within the same frame Social drama – a film dealing with social relationships and conflicts between characters Techniques in Billy Elliot

Technique 1
Mise-en-scene. French for “to put in a scene” – this is the composition of elements that make up a scene and creates an overall impression We need to contrast 2 scenes in detail to understand the vast contrast between the world that Billy leaves, and the world he moves into. Mise-en-scene 1

The kitchen – argument between Mrs Wilkinson and Tony
Set details
Strongly patterned wallpaper, pots on the cooker, dishes cluttered on the bench, paintwork chopped and worn, open cupboard shows mismatched bowls, utilitarian utensils, clothes handing – clutter, garishness, mismatched colours and patterns, disarray Lighting – naturalistic, dim, filtering through the kitchen window Sound – silence in the kitchen until Billy is thrust onto the table, then the Boogie music starts as if generates by the anger between Mrs Wilkinson and Tony. Language – Tony is his usual brutish, explosive use of obscenity. Mrs Wilkinson begins with restraint but descends to Tonys usage as the argument builds- „sanctimonious little shit” and “piss your wages up the wall” Camera work – midrange shot places Jackie sitting with Tony dominant, grandma, as ever, is peripheral to the shot. The midrange puts the characters in context. Close-ups of Tony and Mrs Wilkinson as they argue, back and forth adds to the sense of energy and confusion the argument generates, and allows the reader to observe their reactions as they battle over Billy. Placement of characters – Tony stands in front of the window, blocking some of the light, he is dominant; Jackie sits silently, he seems to have lost, not only his job, but control of the family; Grandma sits at the edges, part of the family but with no significance; Mrs Wilkinson stands at the edges of this family near the kitchen door; Billy is behind the door, only his head peering around at the action – he is central to this scene but has no voice, when doe does make a comment Tony commands him to „Shut up‟.1 What does this scene tell us? – The mess of all the bits and pieces and the number of bodies in a small place gives the sense of oppression, overcrowding, of...
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