Big Brother Invades Our Classrooms

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“Big Brother” Invades our Classrooms
Do you like being watched? Do you enjoy your every move being monitored as if someone is watching a movie, and you are the main character? That’s what it is like for students at some schools that have invested in the use of surveillance cameras in their hallways and classrooms. Many people are all for this. Saying to put the cameras in classrooms won’t do any harm. But there are also many who think otherwise. There are many reasons either way, but the greater good will come from the cameras being removed from classrooms. Having surveillance cameras in classrooms is a bad idea because it invades privacy, costs a lot of money, and shows distrust in students.

Some people believe that surveillance cameras act as shields against people like shooters. They think that having the cameras will stop the “bad guys” from coming in. But really, if you are going to go into a classroom and start killing people, you’re not going to let a camera stop you. Especially if you are special needs, which a large majority of shooters are. A petition is in progress for releasing video footage of the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting. (www.godlikeproductions.com ) This proves that there were, in fact cameras in the classroom at the time, and they did not stop the murderer. Some people also believe that cameras will stop bullying. However, physical bullying really isn’t that common anymore, and cameras won’t stop verbal or cyber bullying. Paul Weyrich once said “Cameras in classrooms are no substitute for greater authority by parents and teachers.” (www.searchquotes.com) This statement is valid, and more importantly, true.

People develop a sense of confidence as they grow older, but as elementary, middle, or high school students, they are extremely naïve. Being watched all the time shows students that their principle or whoever is in charge at the school does not trust them. Paul Abramson, of a school design committee in Larchmont, New York...
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