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Bibliography Videogames

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Bibliography Videogames

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  • October 12, 2010
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* “Video Games: A Cause of Violence and Aggression” from SerendipUpdate's blog. Fri, 01/04/2008.
<http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/node/1723>
This site provided basic information about social problems merged with video gamers tendencies. It does raise some important issues about the effect of videogames in our society and status that may be useful for my Recommendation Report. It is a commercial site rather than an academic site, so it provides some internal opinions of the writer and from the public (it’s an open space) which are helpful but not 100% trustful. It does list some primary sources. In general, I would use this site in my research as an extra add, but I wouldn’t base all my paper on the information provided over here.

* Douglas A. Gentile and Craig A. Anderson, from “Do Video Games Lead to Violence?” Violent Video Games: The Newest Media Violence Hazard, (Praeger, 2003). < http://www.mhprofessional.com/product.php?isbn=0073515108> The authors of this article, psychologist Douglas A. Gentile, and Craig A. Anderson discussed the importance of a healthy development during childhood and teenage, they assert that violent video games cause several physiological and psychological changes in children that lead to aggressive and violent behavior. Their hypothesis is proved by researches and statistics that are mentioned in the article, they prove current evidence of a substantial connection between exposure to violent video games and serious real-life violence in this article. I personally believe it's a good and effective resource that I can use in my Recommendation Report.

* New York, Lawrence Kutner and Cheryl Olson.“Grand Theft Childhood: The Surprising Truth About Violent Video Games and What Parents Can Do”
Press 2008
Geared for parents and as the title indicates, many of the social problems described may come unexpected: predominantly, the believe that exposing children to violent games is not as risky...