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Bi Racial

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  • June 2008
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Abstract
When I was growing up I had a hard time understanding why I looked so different than the other girls did. I was always the one that did not fit in, my hair; eyes and skin were darker than the rest. I did not have anyone that I could relate to and had a hard time making friends because I was so different. I used to wish that I was white my hair blonde and my eyes blue, I did not accept the fact that I could never be something I was not. I was the only minority in my school until fifth grade. The minorities stuck together as we were not easily accepted, and it was not until high school that we were allowed a multi cultural group in which we could address our similarities, and differences. I am a bi racial and have no real group that I feel I belong in, and like most bi racial children I struggled with my own identity. I was taller than all the Asians and had too dark of features to blend in with the Whites. The answers to the core questions are all No, because there are not too many people like me around. Most people who are bi racial are mixed with black, and I am mixed with Asian. When the media talks of race they are always talking of one solid race and we are left out of the topic. I think that my community can help by broadening the spectrum and allowing all people to be involved. This means letting children be aware of both their cultural sides and by making places where people feel welcome no matter what they look like. I am going to cover what it is like to grow up in a world where you are never accepted and always asked "what are you". There are many like me, but not enough to be recognized. In my community

Over the last few years Minnesota has become more racially diverse, it is estimated that in 2030 16 % of the population in Minnesota will be people of color. That is an increase of half when you compare the 9% color proportion in 2000. (Toney, 2006) The people in my community are usually white and no racism is portrayed, but it does...