Bhagavad Gita

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James Kim
UGC 111

The Bhagavad Gita’s purpose is to deliver mankind from the shadows of material existence. Each and every one of us has adversities in many ways. We try to exist in the material world but the atmosphere of this material world ceases to exist. Our existence is eternal and is not to be threatened by nonexistence. Lord Krishna says that for the soul there is neither birth nor death at any point. It has not come, does not come, and will not come into being. It is unborn, eternal, and primeval. The body and the soul are two different entities. The body is subjected to six transformations, starting from birth and ending at death. The soul does not go through these changes because it is not born and takes on a material body. When the body deteriorates and dies, the soul is not affected and is free from any changes of the body. When Arjuna decides to join the fight, he sees the sons of Dhritarashtra drawn into the array and asks Krishna to draw his chariot between the two fighting forces. When his mind sees the imminent death of his teacher, friends, and relatives, he throws down his weapon and decides not to fight. Lord Krishna counters Arjuna’s objection to fight and explains that fighting in his service is transcendental and will bring no sinful punishments. Lord Krishna encourages Arjuna to remain loyal in his service to fight and to ignore his mind’s desires. Krishna’s arguments are convincing because war is war. One needs to be mentally strong and not stray away because of inhibitions. Gilgamesh would have better reconciled himself to his own and Enkindu’s death if he had shared Krishna’s beliefs about the soul because the soul lives on forever regardless of what happens to the body. Gilgamesh should see it as not even dying as both he and Enkidu are still living through their souls.
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