Beowulf

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11/20/2012. English IV’H 7TH pd.

*BEOWULF, parts 7-11. -Active Reading Questions.

*PART 7, pp. 30-32.
1. The way in which Beowulf compares his defeat of the sea monsters to a feast is they crowded around him, all wanting to fill their bellies with his flesh. 2. I would have to disagree with Beowulf on this because I don’t believe that his words hold true in our present day. In other words I don’t believe that anyone would try to go up against a murderer or a vicious killer unarmed because you would know that your chances are slim to none of being victorious. You would either for law enforcement or hide until your attacker leaves because if you muster up a bit of courage and try to fight surely you would figure out that death would be coming your way. 3. Unferth serves as a foil to Beowulf because Beowulf believes that Unferth is of no match for him, while Beowulf tells of his heroic tales Unferth remains silent because no such tales of him is in existence. 4. In accordance to the text and clues within the text afflicted closely means causing harm or physical pain. 5. The coming of night is personified by it covering earth with its net while shapes of darkness moved black and silent. *PART 8, pp.32-33.

1. I believe that Beowulf allowed Grendel to slaughter one of the Geats before taking action himself because in my opinion he was awaiting the moment when Grendel attacked him so the monster could be aware that Beowulf’s strength matches his. 2. The kennings that associated Grendel with evil were that he was a shepherd of evil, a guardian of crime. 3. Examples of alliteration provided in these lines, 440-504, are flight, fastened and cracked, clutched.

*PART 9, pp. 34-35.
1. The action of Beowulf’s men upholds the Anglo-Saxon code of honor in the sense that they are ready and prepared to attack if needed to protect their leader, their price at all cost seem fit. 2....
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