Benefits of Music Training (7 Pages)

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Benefits of Music Training
There have been concerns and questions whether or not music should be offered as a class in public schools. Students who received daily music training for seven months had higher reading scores at the end than a control group did that received little or no musical training. A year later, the scores were compared again and the students that had musical training were still higher than the students reading scores were. (Annette Kingsbury). With this statistic, many people believe in getting a fine arts education back in school for children to improve their learning skills. In recent years, music training is not as important as it used to be. Many schools offer music as an extracurricular activity. In American schools and around the world are dropping the music classes; therefore making music teachers lose their jobs and students lose their musical expression and experience. Protests are starting to come around from the parents and the teachers who want to get their children back into music and art classes in school. The protests are not as effective as they could be but are starting to make a difference. Protests are helping along with television commercials that are trying to bring the music back into our schools and neighborhoods. Music has more of a benefit than we think. The costs of instruments aren’t as high in stores anymore, due to the lack of value that we are making the instruments have. By not encouraging music, they sit in the stores and collect dust rather than letting children learn and expand their knowledge of music. The drum, violin and the piano are on the popular side when it comes to instruments that the parents to choose for their children. This is because they are some of the most basic learning instruments. It was also shown that preschoolers who had piano training did better at math reasoning than a different group who had a computer instead of a piano. When students had drum practice they would have to figure out the notes and clue out the different rhythms and how they work in sync to sound good. Figuring this out is a Renteria 2

complicated thought process for a child to learn; therefore improving intelligence. Music training is shown to improve children’s verbal memory, literacy and overall IQ scores. When a child is playing or learning to play an instrument, it improves verbal memory. It improves verbal memory by learning the notes on the instrument that’s being played, along with learning how to read notes, it also improves memory because you have to remember which note is which and the placements on the chords which tell you where to place your fingers on the instrument. Even if it just sounds like a four year old is just banging around aimlessly on the drums, there is a great significance to that banging; they are learning something and improving their memory! “Magnetic resonance imaging has shown that the left plenum temporal region of the brain is larger in musicians than in non-musicians.” (Music Training Improves) This kind of memory technique is also known as muscle memory. Muscle memory is when the brain does something over and over enough for the brain to come familiar with it over time, kind of like common sense. After affecting the muscle memory, this can help with attention span and improve its span to be superior, especially when it comes to math classes, test and quiz scores, students usually do the worst on this type of subject due to a short attention span and just not being able to concentrate. “Not only do the brains of musically-trained children respond to music in a different way to those of the untrained children, but also that the training improves their memory as well” (First Evidence That). When learning notes, it is not as simple as it seems, you have to learn a different way than the average human brain is used to comprehending. Training on how to make the brain work in a different way and thinking outside the box is necessary...
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