Belonging - Peter Skryznecki & Mean Girls

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Belonging is not always a good thing. What disadvantages are there for individuals and society in belonging? Refer to set text and one other related text.

Belonging in some instances can not be beneficial for ones wellbeing. Negative consequences may arise from the way in which one develops belonging. Barriers to belonging can be imposed or voluntarily constructed, and allowing one to distort the barriers can affect the way one belongs to people, places, groups or the larger world.

Peter Skryznecki’s persistent desire to connect/belong to his cultural heritage is carried forth in various poems, such as Feliks Skryznecki and Postcard. Cultural barriers determine whether the composer/responder is able to belong, and shows the ways in which he attempts to belong. The continual desire to belong to a social group and the want to mature is defined through the film Mean Girls by Mark Waters in 2004. As a teenager, the necessity to belong to a group is crucial. However her choice to socialise with one group and not another infringes on her friendship, and inturn creates tragedy for all her friends around her.

Connections can be formulated through relations with people, places, groups and the larger world. For the composer to be connected through the poem Feliks Skryznecki, he learns to understand his father, with much attention around his cultural identity and connections with his place of birth. However, the son feels dislocated from his place of birth along with his perceived cultural isolation as a migrant. This results in a lack of connectedness from social and cultural groups: ‘Happy as I have never been’. His father’s connection with his places of birth is maintained, despite his exile, and consequently his perceptions of his self and identity are intact. However, the son realises his sudden dislocation with adolescence and movement away from his cultural identity. This is symbolised in the final stanza;

‘At thirteen
Stumbling over tenses in Caesers...
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