Beijing

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Beijing

I’m going to look at how Beijing’s (while mentioning China) climate will be affected and change if the average temperature will rise, creating global warming around the world.

An overview of how Beijing’s
weather and climate is currently. Average temperature in January is -7o to -4o C, while average temperatures in July are at 25o to 26 °C. Highest temperature ever recorded is 42°C and lowest recorded is -27°C. Annual precipitation is over 600 mm, with 75% of that in summer.
Beijing is located in a high pressure area. Under the scorching sun in summer, heavy rainstorms also sees to occur late in the season. The city's climate is a monsoon-influenced humid continental climate characterized by hot, humid summers due to the East Asian monsoons, and generally cold, windy winters that reflect the influence of the vast Siberian anticyclone. Frequent typhoons coming from the Pacific Ocean also influence the city but in a minor scale, most of the typhoons make their direction for Japan and never really reaches into Beijing.

Springtime weather in Asia produces intense wind storm events that can pass over the Gobi Desert along the northern China / Mongolia. These prevailing westerly winds brings dust from the desert and trough suspension carries the sand dust via Beijing and further on. This threatens Beijing by a rolling tide of sand advancing on the capital from the Gobi Desert that is responsible for the massive dust storms every spring. If we then assume that the average temperature is rising, I think that the long term warming will cause a bit more spreading (in number) of natural hazards such as monsoons, (droughts), typhoons leading to more severe rainfall. Since the typhoons never really reaches the city but foremost Japan (due to the coriolis force/effect) the size and number may increase...
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