Behaviour Modification Program

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 133
  • Published : October 31, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview

1) Defining Target Behavior and Competing Behaviors 2 2) Goal Setting 3 3) Logistics 4 4) Functional Assessment 5 5) Choosing appropriate self-management strategies 8 6) Evaluating Change 12 7) Implementing Maintenance Strategies 16 8) Discussion and Limitations 18 9) Appendix

10) Bibliography

Defining Target Behavior and Competing Behaviors:

My aim in this behavior modification program is to increase the number of fruit intake and at the same time decrease the amount of sugars intake. Fruit intake implies both quantity and quality, simple meaning that I have intended to eat more fruit but also of different kinds. The rationale behind it is to be more flexible in future terms after the program has ended, thus decreasing monotony and increasing the probability to eat fruit. I decided to choose such behavior modification mainly for health reasons. I mainly needed to decrease sugar intake and thus replacing glucose and other sugars that might rot the teeth and cause other major problems later in life such as diseases like Diabetes, with fructose. Formally stating my competing behaviors as being sugars and other unhealthy food that will potentially interfere with the program because I have noted that I tend to pursue a all- or- nothing response. This means that I either start my day feeling the urge to eat healthy or else head into a masochistic approach and torture my body with sugars and fats that have been reinforced with stressing periods throughout the years. So that is why in my diet I have emphasized breakfasts and have included it in my behavior modification program. Goal Setting:

The write-up was designed and written to follow a set of steps used in a self- management plan. The steps are however interlinked in a way because for example when setting a goal one must keep in mind the last step also, that is “Maintenance strategies” increasing the validity of the program. Two other factors had to be considered, first that time acted as a restricting factor and secondly in order for it to be effective, rewards had to exceed costs. “In addition, goal achievement is a conditioned reinforcer for many people or may become a conditioned reinforcer if other reinforcers are delivered when the person achieves the goal” (Miltenberger R.G. p438). An appropriate goal was set at the beginning of the plan that is I had to eat at least 5 fruits a day for a minimum of 4 consecutive days, not necessarily of different types. My intent was really to increase the baseline from zero to an average of 2 fruits every 2 or 3 days after the behavior modification program and as result I will decrease any competing behaviors mentioned earlier.

Logistics of recording:

It was decided that I use an A-B design for my program, which includes 10 days of baseline and 20 days of treatment. My intake of fruits was practically zero but however I needed an amount of time to record any antecedents, consequences of both target and competing behaviors. I had time to produce and check out an ‘abc’ checklist that I later tested and adopted for the treatment period. I will speak more in detail about this checklist in the next chapter. As my recording tools I simply used pen and paper to record each time I ate either sugars or fruits, technically denoted as ‘continuous recording’. The component of time was divided into three parts, ‘M’ for morning, ‘A’ for the afternoon and ‘E’ to represent evenings. Again the reasoning behind it is for one thing it would be much easier to record and interpret results since one of my...
tracking img