Behaviors in the Workplace

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Behaviors at Work
The workplace is thought to be a place to work and earn a living to support yourself and your family. Since most of an individual’s time is spent at work, they should enjoy going there each day. The goal, to perform the tasks assigned and receive benefits for performing the task and duties assigned. There are some individuals who are not motivated to do the task/duties and are just there to receive a pay check. Those particular individuals tend to create problems for their co-workers, therefore, creating negative work behaviors. What are some of the behaviors and how do they impact other employees and their job performance? Let’s look at the following areas: 1. Different styles of Workplace Behaviors

2. Laws on Workplace Behavior?
3. Legalities of workplace behavior?
4. Performance affected by behaviors
In order to help Human Resources and management recognize the disruptive behaviors that may cause performance problems or legal issues it is important to understand the areas of behavior that affects performance. The definition of workplace behavior as defined in the business dictionary is: Workplace behavior is a pattern of actions and interactions of the members of an organization that directly or indirectly affects its effectiveness. Different styles of Workplace Behavior

There are seven different ways people may behave in the workplace. The following article is provided by Fabricating and Metalworking. Francie Dalton, founder and president of Dalton Alliances, Inc., provides that the following may not include all the actions of your co-workers but will provide a helpful way in dealing with them. The seven types include: commanders, drifters, attackers, pleasers, performers, avoiders, and analyticals. Let’s review each type and view what each type does. Commanders are curt and controlling and do not offer time for being nice. They have no intention on offending; they lack the ability and tactfulness in getting their point across. A boss that is a commander may fail to delegate important assignments. Dalton acknowledges that you should value their abilities to overcome obstacles, to implement, and achieve results. Drifters have no use for structure and tend to have trouble with rules, work hours and deadlines. They may leave a project undone or lose track of the task and details. They can be friendly; however their disorganization can be displeasing. A supervisor who is a drifter will fail to provide structure and as an employee they can make their manager appear to be ineffective. Dalton believes you should value a drifter for their innovation and creativity, their ability to improvise on a moment’s notice, and their out-of-the-box thinking. Attackers will be ill-tempered and contemptuous. They can suppress workplace morale. They will put down others to make themselves appear superior. If they are a manager, they can push an employee to a breaking point. As an employee they could corrupt ones entire staff. Dalton acknowledges an attacker for their ability to tackle the unwanted assignments and their ability to make unemotional decisions. Pleasers will be respectable, sociable and friendly to others and look at their co-workers as an extended family. They will rarely say no to help others. They will avoid conflict since they do not do well with it. As a supervisor they lack the ability to provide feedback and will value relationships above the company. Dalton says, “Value and validate pleasers for the way they humanize the workplace, and for their helpful, collaborative work style.” Performers will be witty, charismatic and outspoken. The performer will do just that; provide entertainment for those around them. They do well at promoting themselves and may take credit for things they may have or have not done. If the manger is a performer, they may not give credit to the employee’s hard work and achievements and in return deflect their...
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