Beer Industry Austlia Market Mix

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Beer Industry

Table of Content

1. Executive summary
2. Content
3. Micro Environment
1. Organization
2. Suppliers
3. Marketing intermediaries
4. Customers
5. Competitors
6. Publics
4. Macro Environment
1. Demography
2. Economic Environment
3. Natural Environment
4. Technological Environment
5. Political Environment
6. Cultural Environment
5. Product Strategies
6. Place Strategies
7. Promotion Strategies
8. Price Strategies
9. Conclusion

1. Executive summary

The beer industry has been around for centuries and is still growing strong as to date. This report talks about the macro and microenvironment and the 4 P’s of the beer industry. It shows that in the beer industry every force is important to it and can affect the company in one way or another. And with the changes of consumers how the beer industry copes with it. As changes happen, the beer industry will have to change to survive one another and from other alcoholic beverages.


In this report, the macro environment (demographic, cultural, economic, natural, technological, political), micro environment (organisation, market channel firms, customer markets, competitors, publics) and 4 P’s (price, product, place, promotion) regarding beer will be discussed.

3. Micro Environment

Micro environment are forces such as organization, market channel firms, customer markets, competitors and publics that are close to the organization that will affect its ability to perform and serve its customers. In this section, each force will be discussed and how it affects the beer market.

3.1 Organization

Organization here refers to the company. For an organization to work well, all the different groups in an organization such as top management, finance, research and development (R&D), purchasing, manufacturing and accounting must work together.

To design a marketing plan, all the different groups must be taken into account. As such, a market-orientated organization means that information is shared among the groups and thus, forms the internal environment.

Senior management will set the organization’s mission, objectives, broad strategies and polices. It is then the marketing manager task to work within these decisions and come up with a plan, which must be approved by the senior management. The marketing manager must work together with the other groups so that the will know how is finance distributed, what products have the R&D invented, what are the sales like, how well is the market reacting to its product and so on. And if a marketing plan is adopted, the organization must ‘think customer’ and work together to exceed customer’s expectations.

If the different groups in an organization do not work together, customer’s satisfactions may get affected and so will the performance. And if another organization that sells the same product has a well-organized organization, that organization may in the end get the larger share of the market.

3.2 Suppliers

Suppliers play an important role as they determine the value of your organization’s product. They are the one that provides the organization its resources to produce its good and services and any developments within the suppliers can affect marketing plans. Events such as labour strikes, natural disasters, shortage of supply and any other events can raise the cost of production and force prices to increase which inturn will affect sales volume and customer’s satisfactions. Thus, marketing managers must keep a close monitors on events happening around its suppliers.

In recent years, the prices of hops, wheat and barley have been rising. These are the ingredients used in brewing beer. As the cost price increases, organization maybe forced to increasing the price of their beer and this may lead to customers changing to a cheaper beer brand or change to other...
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