Becoming a Mandated Reporter

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Unit 6 Project: Child abuse and what it takes to be a mandated reporter Kaplan University
CM 107-27

1. Introduction:
A What is a Mandated Reporter
B. Profession that are to report child abuse
2. What is child abuse ?
A) What are the different types of child abuse?
B) Physical Abuse, Sexual Abuse Maltreatment and child neglect 3) What are the steps in reporting child abuse
A) Keeping it confidential
B) State regulation on how to report
C) How to deal with parents on notification
D) Who can help?

4) Personal dealings with child abuse
A) Opinions on how to deal with children and discipline
B) Conclusion

There are many challenges that are faced daily when becoming or being a mandated reporter. Questions are always asked within one self what the right steps are in taking precautionary measure in protecting a child from harm. I myself feel as a childcare provider a child’s safety is much more important than anything in this world. Mandated reporters are individuals and professionals who are required to have a report made when, in the ordinary course of their employment or profession, they have reason to believe that a child under the age of 18 has been abused, neglected or is placed in a risk of serious harm by anyone which can include guardians or even staff members of their own establishment. Here is a list of candidates who are required by law to report any type of suspicion of child abuse or neglect to the state. These mandated reporters are people in professions or occupations that have contact with children or whose primary focus is children. * Chiropractors

* Dental Hygienists
* Dentists
* Department of Children and Families Employees
* Department of Public Health employees responsible for the licensing of child day care centers, group day care homes, family day care homes or youth camps. * Foster Parents 
* Judicial Department Employees
* Licensed/Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselors
* Licensed/Certified Emergency Medical Services Providers * Licensed Marital and Family Therapists
* Licensed or Unlicensed Resident Interns
* Licensed or Unlicensed Resident Physicians
* Licensed Physicians
* Licensed Practical Nurses
* Licensed Professional Counselors
* Licensed Surgeons
* Medical Examiners
* Members of the Clergy
* Mental Health Professionals
* Optometrists
* Parole Officers (Juvenile or Adult)
* Pharmacists
* Physical Therapists
* Physician Assistants
* Podiatrists
* Police Officers
* Probation Officers (Juvenile or Adult)
* Psychologists
* Registered Nurses
* Sexual Assault Counselors
* Social Workers
* School Employees - means a teacher, substitute teacher, school administrator, school superintendent, guidance counselor, psychologist, social worker, nurse, etc… Child abuse arises where a youth has had physical harm inflicted on him or her other than by accidental means, has injuries at discrepancy with history given of them, or is in a condition resulting in maltreatment, such as, but not limited to, malnutrition, sexual molestation or exploitation, deprivation of necessities, emotional maltreatment or cruel punishment.  

Child neglect occurs where a child has been abandoned, is being denied proper care and attention physically, emotionally, or is being allowed to live under conditions, circumstances or associations injurious to his well-being.

Indicators of Physical Abuse Can Include: Injuries to the eyes or both sides of the head or body (accidental injuries typically only affect one side of the body); Frequent injuries of any kind (bruises, cuts, and/or burns), especially if the child is unable to provide a sufficient clarification of the cause. These may appear in distinctive patterns such as grab marks, human bite marks or cigarette burns. Actions may include destructive, aggressive, or disruptive behavior....
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