Becoming a Helper

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1. To observe and rationalize our motivations and needs for becoming helpers can help us

develop competent and practical approaches within the helping profession. I view human

struggle as a catalyst for unity, in various degrees because in the face of adversary, we are

naturally inclined to confide in others, seeking what we need to rise above

certain circumstances. To elevate and uplift is directly connected towards my need to care for

others, which has been a driving force behind my decision to enter the helping profession.

Growing up, I had a strong sense of empathy, being able to make connections with my

peers, from different walks of life. A lot of the times, I felt as if it was my “duty” to ensure

that no burdens had to be carried by anyone. Within the SSW program, I’m looking to cultivate

my ability to care for others effectively. “One of the pitfalls of being a caregiver to significant

people in your life is that very often no one attends to your needs” (Corey&Corey, 2007, p.5).

I agree with this statement because there are times where I feel so caught up with needs of others

I begin to disregard my own. Finding balance between my emotional well being and the well

being of my clients is imperative in order to deliver the quality service that they are entitled to.

Rejuvenation is essential. “The reality is that many clients will not express appreciation for your

efforts nor will some of them make changes in their lives” (Corey&Corey, 2007, p. 6). Which is

why we shouldn’t rely on our clients exclusively to feel like useful human beings

(Corey&Corey, 2007). Finding pride and self worth from other sources in order to maintain

composure in the field is also essential. Although it is understandable for wanting to feel

appreciated for that you are doing for others (Corey&Corey, 2007).

From a personal point of view, the need to return a favor is closely linked (in terms of motives

and obstacles) with the need to care for others. Through the supervision from figures of

authority such as my parents and teachers, I was able to foster a positive outlook on life which

has molded me into the person I am today, for which I am eternally grateful. There is an evident

aspect of spirituality within my need to return a favor. Coming from a Catholic/religious

background, I’ve come to learn that a life of a selfless service well justifies the death of Jesus

Christ. That alone, adds so much more purpose to the process of becoming a social service

worker. Criticism towards any of my beliefs does not hinder me considering that sentimental

value is the core of this profession. To emulate all of the role models that made such a

significant impact on my life is a life long journey that will come with many rewards that

outweigh potential hardships. And just like every other kid, making my parents proud would

be a peak accomplishment which can further strengthen the bonds we share.

2. The need to make an Impact is relevant to my personal profile because when dealing with

clients may have a need to know that I’m making a positive difference in someone’s daily

existence (Corey&Corey, 2007). As social service workers, making an impact is what we strive

for. Regardless of form, I strongly uphold my belief that impact can help initiate the route to self

empowerment for our clients.

The need for money is not a priority for me within this profession. “In most cases, beginning

helpers struggle financially, and many professionals feel that they are not adequately

compensated for their work” (Corey & Corey, 2007, p.6). In my opinion, if you’re in this

profession for all of the right reason knowing that you’re helping others is compensation within

itself. Although you don’t need to feel guilty for wanting to earn a good living (Corey&Corey,

2007,)....
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