Becoming Self-Aware

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Becoming Self-Aware
Self-awareness is a very important part of our everyday lives. Without it we end up becoming ignorant of everything important in our everyday life. This can include neglecting loved ones, failing at some of the simple things we are tasked with and much more. In Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, Willy Loman was the perfect example of someone who lacked self-awareness. Willy could have been successful but instead, pursued what he believed to be the only goal worth achieving. In the short story “The Drunkard” by Frank O’Connor, the father is an alcoholic and only through his son does he gain the self-awareness to see this. Death of a Salesman and “The Drunkard” are very similar because they both convey the message of how important it is to have self-awareness.

One of the most important reasons that self-awareness is important is because of the impact it can have on those around you. In Death of a Salesman, Willy was completely ignorant of what he was doing to his family. He failed to see that he was not destined to be a salesman and this was the root of his many problems. He had a dream that Biff would grow up to be very successful but failed to see that he was no more than just a common man. Biff realized that he was never destined to become a salesman and tried to tell his father that. “… I never got anywhere because you blew me so full of hot air” (Miller 130). This tore the family apart and by the end of it, forced Biff to leave. In “The Drunkard”, Mick Delaney was ignorant of the fact that he had a drinking problem and when the opportunity for a drink presented itself, he did not turn it down. Mick believed that the only person that this problem affected was himself and he failed to see that it affected his family. He was willing to expose his son to things a child should not see just so he could enjoy himself. Even when his wife tried to stop him from going his response was “I’ll look after Larry” (O’Connor 278). Only when his son...
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