Because I Never Learned

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HIST 151.3 (R02): Pre-Confederation Canada
Course Syllabus, Winter 2013
University of Saskatchewan, Royal West College

Instructor: Jason ZorbasTutor: Sarah York-Bertram
Class Time: Mon/Wed,12:30-2:00 Tutorials: Wed. 3:30-5:00
Office: Arts, 253Email: sarah.york@usask.ca
Phone: 220-1675
Email: jason.zorbas@usask.ca

Introduction
Canada’s history is a complex, yet exciting story that includes conflict, loss, change and success. HIST 151 explores this story from the pre-contact period to Confederation. The course, however, is not simply an introduction to Canadian history, but is also an introduction to the discipline of history itself. We will discuss not only political, economic and military narratives but we will also explore women, Aboriginal peoples, immigrants and class conflict. Canadian history, like Canadian society itself, is a rich tapestry of interwoven stories.

The Course
The course consists of five major areas, the lectures, the textbook, the tutorials, the writing assignments and the exams. The mid-term and the final exam will require knowledge of the material presented in the lectures, the tutorials and the textbook. There are also a number of writing assignments. The first is an essay proposal. The second are short tutorial assignments which are due at the beginning of each tutorial. The third is the essay. There will be an essay workshop where the various writing assignments are explained in detail as well as an exam review at the end of the course.

Lectures
NOTE: Textbook readings are in italics
1. Explorations in history, culture and writing
i. Historiography (xvii-xvix)
ii. Aboriginal Society, pre-contact (7-28)
iii. European Society, pre-contact (29-47)
iv. Essay workshop

2. Contacts, Colonies, Old and New Societies
i. European Exploration and First Contact (48-63)
ii. Native-Newcomer Relations (64-82)
iii. Colonial Society in New France (84-102, 121-143)
iv. French-English Rivalry in North America (103-120, 142-160)

3. Conquest, Losses and War
i. Consequences of Conquest (162-181)
ii. Loyalists Arrival (182-192)
iii. Aboriginal Resistance
iv. The War of 1812 (193-206)

4. Developments in the East and West
i. Changes to the Atlantic Colonies (223-260)
ii. The Fur Trade (207-212, 303-317)
iii. Birth of the Métis Nation (212-219)
iv. The Pacific Northwest (318-332)

5. Cultural and Social Developments in British North America (334-356, 373-387) i. Gender Norms and Cultural Ideals
ii. Religious Revival in the Maritimes
iii. Irish Immigration
iv. Aboriginal Societies and British Governance

6. Political Developments in British North America
i. Rebellions of 1837-38 (283-293)
ii. Durham's Report and Responsible Government (293-302)
iii. The Road to Confederation (388-410)
iv. The Creation of Canada

Tutorial Schedule
January 9No Tutorial Reading
January 16No Tutorial Reading
January 23Alfred W. Crosby, “Virgin Soil Epidemics as a Factor in the Aboriginal Depopulation in America” January 30Peter Moogk “The Liturgy of Humiliation, Pain and Death: The Execution of Criminals in New France” February 6Jon Parmenter and Mark Power Robison, “The Perils and Possibilities of Wartime Neutrality on the Edges of Empire: Iroquois and Acadians between the French and the British in North America, 1744-1760” February 13Richard Jensen, “Military History on the Electronic Frontier: Wikipedia Fights the War of 1812” February 20No Tutorial – Study Break

February 27No Tutorial – Focus on the Mid-Term
March 6Allan Greer, “1837-1838: Rebellion Reconsidered” March 13Virginia Petch, “Salt-making in Manitoba”
March 20No tutorial – Work on your Essay
March 27Lynne Marks, “Railing, Tattling and General Rumour: Gossip, Gender and Church Regulation in Upper Canada April 3Rusty Bitterman and Margaret...
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