Bca Sem 1 Assignment

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Year, 2011

(1st Semester)

CS-610 CS-611



|Course Code |Assignment No. | Submission-Schedule |Page No. | | | |For Jan-June Session |For July-Dec Session | | | | |30th April,2011 |30th October,2011 | | |CS-610 |BCA(1)-610/Assign/2011 | | |3 | |CS-611 |BCA(1)-611/Assign/2011 |30th April,2011 |30th October,2011 |6 |

|Course Code |: |CS-610 | |Course Title |: |Foundation Course in English for Computing | |Assignment Number |: |BCA (1)-610/Assignment/12 | |Maximum Marks |: |25 | |Last date of submission |: |30th April 2011/ 30th October 2011 |

There are four questions in this assignment. Answer all questions.

Question 1: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:

Sometime ago a university psychologist made a study of the way professional men and business executives spend their time. He found that they devote seven out of ten of their working hours to giving or getting information. Of these seven hours, 11 per cent went into writing, 15 per cent into reading, 31 per cent into talking, and 43 per cent into listening.

Clearly, then, listening to the words of others is perhaps the most important use we have for our sense of hearing. It might seem that such listening would be a skill in which one would grow better with experience. Unfortunately, the reverse is often the case. It is quite possible that young children in general are better at listening to other’s talk than most mature men and women.

In another study, scientists attempted to determine how effectively business executives listen. The survey covered someone hundred firms. One almost incredible finding was that men at the second level of command, the directors and managers, seemed on the average to misunderstand or to fail to understand about one-third of what they were told by their colleagues.

Such a loss of listening ability is by no means inevitable. Many individuals retain for life the capacity for careful listening that seems to come naturally to most children in the years when it is their all-important way of learning. Authorities on the subject have a number of suggestions for those who seek to retain or regain that ability. One suggestion is to remember that words are merely symbols with which we try to communicate ideas and feelings to each other. If we are going to succeed, both the speaker and the listener must get together on what they mean by these symbols.

The commonest cause of poor listening is the unthinking assumption that words can mean only what they mean to you. If your telephone rings and you pick it up and hear a strange voice say “it was cold today”, you cannot know what temperature he means. He may be calling from some place where a temperature of say, fifty degrees would seem cold, or where it would seem warm. To find out approximately what temperature the word refers to, you have to find out in what context the speaker is using to....
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