Battle of Verdun

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“Battle of Verdun”

It has been described as one of the bloodiest battle of WWI. The battle of Verdun first sparked in February, 1916 and ended in December. It was a battle between Germany and France. What made Verdun significant is that France did not expect the Germans to attack at that location, so France had to send in troops that weren’t ready to that battle field to protect the Verdun; a place that has a deep meaning to France. This made the French troops more spreaded out into small groups around Verdun. Many deaths were the result of this surprise attack of the Germans.

In the battle field, trenches were made to help avoid the bombardment from both sides. Bombardment was the main weapon used in this battle and millions of shells from both sides were shot, which made this battle very chaotic. Gases were used too to blind the enemy, also known as chemical warfare. This battle has arisen never before seen weapons in wars at that time, and one of them is the gas. After the battle, there were hardly any trenches left because of the explosions from the bombardment and more than over three-hundred thousand soldiers at both sides have died, and over seven-hundred thousand were wounded.

The goal of this tactic from Germany was to drain France of their resources, also known as attrition, which happens a lot in WWI, but this battle was one of the chaotic battles. You might wonder why did France send in troops to Verdun instead of letting that place be taken. The answer to that is because Verdun is a historical place to France; it’s the birthplace of France. They will protect a place that they are very sentimental to and that became one of France’s goal during that war; to protect Verdun. The aftermath of this battle was the death of hundred thousands of soldiers with no advances into each territory.
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