Battle of Quebec

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  • Topic: Quebec City, Quebec, Louis-Joseph de Montcalm
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University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras Campus Department of Military Sciences Taíno Warriors Battalion

The Battle of Quebec
Military History CPT Gonzalez

Carlos Colon Rivera

September 28, 2011


Battle of Quebec


he Battle of the Plains of Abraham, also known as the Battle of Quebec, was a crucial

advance towards the battle ground Native Americans (Indians) and militia start

shooting against the British in an attempt to slow down their movement.

battle in North America’s theater of war of the French and Indian War in the United The battle, which began on

September 13, 1759, was fought between the British Army and Navy, and the French Army, on a plateau just outside the walls of Quebec City (1).

Figure 2 – Diagram of the assault on Quebec

British regulars continue forward the enemy

lines and fight their way into the plains. In a battle text maneuver the British army forms up two ranks extended one mile across the Figure 1 - Drawing by a soldier of Wolfe's army depicting the easy climbing of Wolfe's soldiers

plain and holds the ground to fight the enemy.

The battle started at approximately 1000 hrs in a land originally own by a farmer named Abraham Martin. As the British Army


In the other hand, Gen. Montcalm (British CG1) prepares his troops lined across the formation and moves forward until is given the command to shot the first volley. This attack was ineffective because was shot to far from the enemy so the French advance within 40 yards from the British. They form again and strike another volley to the British, this time the cotenants can see each other faces. British soldiers stand the attack and reassume their formation. While the

French lines. French troops start retreating to the city of Quebec. Finally the Battle of the Plains of Abraham is over after 15 minutes. Warrior Ethos relationship

Warrior Ethos
I will always place the mission first. I will never accept defeat. I will never quit. I will never leave a fallen comrade.

French troops reload their weapons Gen. James Wolfe (British CG) prepare his "A soldier who quits his rank or offers to offense and give the command fire (2). flag is instantly to be put to death by the The British volley was devastating, a mile wide burst of concentrated fire that daze and caused many fatalities within the French. Then the Frazer Highlanders from the Major Gen. James Wolfe British Army unleashed an advance Wolfe strongly believed in the warrior ethos. man in half. As the wall of bayonets draws Maybe in a very unorthodox way of today’s closer, confusion starts to crumble the thinking but still quitting was not an option 1

officer who commands that platoon. A soldier does not deserve to live who won't fight for his king and his country."

unfolding their swords that could slice a

CG – Commanding General

for this leader.








army values to effectively complete the mission. In the other hand if we analyze how the French Army performs during this battle we can identify how they failed to apply the Warrior Ethos. a. Never quit - First the French Army had low morale and lack of

subordinates; he always leaded them from the front and feared nothing in the middle of the war. He walked up and down the ranks, indifferent to danger, ignoring the sharpshooters and exploding shells, talking to the men and nodding to the officers. He stood once more on the battlefield, excited and unafraid (3). All that was best in the man was there to be seen and admired. A soldier who afterwards proudly wrote that he "was standing at this precise moment of time within four feet of the General," described how happy Wolfe looked. "He was surveying the enemy with a radiant countenance joyful beyond


The composition of its

army and their different tactics cause confusion among themselves. These affected greatly their...
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