Battle of Lexington & Concord

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  • Topic: Paul Revere, Battles of Lexington and Concord, John Hancock
  • Pages : 2 (571 words )
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  • Published : March 16, 2013
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The Spark Which Lighted a Fire
For a long time now our people have been oppressed by the British. The tight grip of their empire on our country can only be loosened by the strength of our people. We have lived in these lands for over a hundred years, obeying everything the monarchy has ordered us to do. It is time for us to stand up and demand the respect we deserve. We as Americans threaten the British, which is why they refuse to let us bear arms. There is no better example of this then the battle of Lexington and Concord. The tension between the people of Boston and the English soldiers is ever growing, more people feel the need to arm themselves and rebel against the British troops. On April 18th, 1775 military general Thomas Gage in an attempt to put a halt to the Boston rebellion sent out his army to the village of Concord to confiscate the arms of the Americans, and to Lexington to capture colonial leaders Samuel Adams and John Hancock. The Americans got heed of this, and sent out messengers Paul Revere, and William Dawes to ride out to Lexington and Concord to warn the militia, and have them prepare to defend themselves. Samuel Adams and John Hancock successfully managed to evade capture by the British soldiers, and most of the arms and ammunition were moved to another location. The British were lead by Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith, when they reached Lexington they had 200 men. The minutemen, lead by Captain John Parker were greatly outnumbered having only 70 men. With nothing but their brothers by their side and the muskets on their backs they stood their ground and waited for the British to approach.  One of the British majors yelled, “Throw down your arms! Ye villains, ye rebels.” The militias were greatly outnumbered; they kept their arms but turned to walk away. In an account by Captain John Parker he states  "I immediately ordered our Militia to disperse, and not to fire: Immediately said, Troops made their appearance and rushed furiously,...
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