Battelle Developmental Inventory - 2nd Edition

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Battelle Developmental Inventory - 2
Jeffery Graham
PSY7610/Test And Measurements
June 15, 2012
Dr. Steven Schneider

Abstract

Table of Contents
Abstract…………………………………………………………………………………………....3 Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………..5 Article Summaries………………………………………………………………………………...7 Evaluation of BDI-2………………………………………………………………………………9 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………...………..12 References………………………………………………………………………………………..14

Abstract
The Battelle Developmental Inventory – 2nd Edition (BDI-2) is psychoeducational testing instrument used in special education to assess developmental disorders in infants and young children. This paper looks into how the validity, reliability and norms for the BDI-2 were originally developed. The paper also investigates several articles related to the use of the BDI-2, it’s psychometric integrity and properties and validates why the BDI-2 is such a useful tool.

Introduction
The Battelle Developmental Inventory -2 (BDI-2) is a standardized assessment that measures children’s developmental performance across five domains and several sub domains. They are: * Adaptive Domain

* Self Care
* Personal Responsibility
* Personal-Social Domain
* Adult Interaction
* Peer Interaction
* Self-Concept and Social Role
* Communication Domain
* Receptive Communication
* Expressive Communication
* Motor Domain
* Gross Motor
* Fine Motor
* Perceptual Motor
* Cognitive Domain
* Attention and Memory
* Reasoning and Academic Skills
* Perception and Concepts
Information from the BDI-2 can be used to provide information concerning the child’s progress as well as data used for creating an Individualized Education Program. The BDI-2 consists of observing the child, having the evaluator interact with the child using different manipulatives, i.e. toys, games or structured tasks and a parent interview. During the screening, the evaluator is looking at the child’s ability to follow directions and completed the chosen tasks. In the event that an area cannot be tested during the session, information from the parent interview can be used as a supplement. The BDI-2 gives a Developmental Quotient (DQ) for each domain, represented in the column labeled Scaled Scores. This number scores at an average of 100, and helps the evaluators to determine performance-based eligibility. If the child’s DQ is more than 23 points under the average (a score of 77 or less), the child may be eligible for special education services in that developmental domain (Elbaum et al., 2010). The BDI-2 is a psychoeducational instrument used heavily in special education testing and can be used to assess children from birth until they turn 12. It’s original intent was to measure and detect assets and deficiencies in developing infants and young children, so as to identify children who have developmental delays, as well as those who may be developmentally advanced (Newborg et al., 2005). Being that there are several testing instruments related to assessing developmental disorders in infants and young children, such as the Young Children’s Achievement Test (YCAT) and Woodcock Johnson, the question is whether the BDI-2 is valid and reliable, and if so is more reliable and valid than other testing instruments used in special education. Based on the literature regarding the BDI-2 and other developmental disorder testing instruments, the BDI-2 is one of the best assessment tools based on it’s reliability and validity and is referred to as the “gold standard” by which other testing measurements are compared to (Dahl et al., 2012). One theory that is relevant to the BDI-2 is the classical test theory that looks to understand and improve reliability of test. Classical test theory posits that individual taking a test would have some a true score if there weren’t in mistakes in how the test was measures,...
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