Basic Chemistry for Investigating Living Systems

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LABORATORY 3:
LABORATORY 3:

Basic Chemistry for Investigating Living Systems

Abstract
The purpose of this experiment was to explain how colorimetry can be used to qualitatively detect cellular chemical components; to chemically differentiate between proteins, sugars, starches, and lipids; to identify the roles of molecular components in living systems; to comprehend the value of using a systematic approach to research; and to describe why hypotheses, controls, standards, and quality control are important in scientific research (Vorndam, 2002, p. 92).

Basic Chemistry for Investigating Living Systems

Abstract
The purpose of this experiment was to explain how colorimetry can be used to qualitatively detect cellular chemical components; to chemically differentiate between proteins, sugars, starches, and lipids; to identify the roles of molecular components in living systems; to comprehend the value of using a systematic approach to research; and to describe why hypotheses, controls, standards, and quality control are important in scientific research (Vorndam, 2002, p. 92).

1 Cutting Board(IndependentVariable)| 1 Sharp Knife(Independent Variable)| 1 Aluminum Foil 6 x 6 cm(Dependent Variable)| 1 Pipet Empty, Short Stem(Dependent Variable)| 1 Pipet, Graduated Jumbo (5 mL)(Dependent Variable)| 1 Distilled Water(Independent Variable)| 1 Potato(Independent Variable)| 2 Beaker, 50 mL Plastic(Dependent Variable)| 1 Test Tube(9), 13 x 100 mm(Dependent Variable)| 1 Benedict's Reagent - 15 mL in Dropper Bottle(Dependent Variable)| 1 Stove or Microwave(Independent Variable)| 1 Aluminum Foil 12 x 12 cm(Dependent Variable)| 1 Cylinder, 50 mL Plastic(Dependent Variable)| 1 Rod, Stirring rod – Glass(Dependent Variable)| 1 Sudan III - 2 mL in Glass Vial(Dependent Variable)| 1 Masking Tape(Independent Variable)| 5 Plastic Jars(Independent Variable)| 1 Dissection Kit(Dependent Variable)| 1 Starch Solution, 1% Stabilized - 60 mL inDropper Bottle(Dependent Variable)| 1 Glucose Solution, 20%(Dependent Variable)| 1 Oven Mittor Pot Holders(Independent Variable)| 1 Onion(Independent Variable)| 1 Filter Paper(Dependent Variable)| 1 Test-tube-rack-12x13-mm(Dependent Variable)| 1 pH 7.0 Buffer (Yellow), 30 mL, in Dropper Bottle(Dependent Variable)| 1 Table Salt(Independent Variable)| Tap Water(Independent Variable)| 1 IKI Indicator, 2.1% - 13 mLin Glass Vial(Dependent Variable)| 1 Thermometer-in-cardboard-tube(Dependent Variable)| 1 Vegetable Oil(Independent Variable)| 1 Microscope(Independent Variable)| 1 Pencil(Independent Variable)| 1 a-Amylase Powder - 0.10 g in Dropper Bottle -Add 10 mL Distilled Water(Dependent Variable)| 1 Plastic Wrap or Aluminum Foil(Independent Variable)| 1 Washcloth(Independent Variable)| 10 Pipet,Long Stem(Dependent Variable)| 1 Biuret Reagent - 4 mL in Pipet(Dependent Variable)| | | |

Quantity/Materials (Independent and Dependent Variables)

Methodologies/Observations/Hypotheses/Results/Conclusions:

Preparations Required Prior to Performing Lab Exercises:

1% Albumen Solution Preparation, used in Exercises 1, 2, 3, 4: Place only the translucent (referred to as the “egg white”) part of an egg into a clean bowl. Avoid adding any white opaque-colored membrane material. Mix the egg white well with a fork to break up the strands of albumen, but do not beat it heavily. Using the graduated pipet, draw up 2 mL of the mixed egg white and place it into a small clean jar. (Vorndam, 2002, p. 97)

Drop 18 mL of the pH 7 buffer solution from the dropper bottle marked “pH 7” into the graduated cylinder. Pour the measured pH 7 buffer from the graduated cylinder into the jar containing the egg white. Stir well using the tip of the graduated pipet. Allow the precipitate to settle before drawing off the albumen solution from the top for use in the experiments. Cover the jar with a lid, plastic wrap, or aluminum foil until needed. Use the marker pencil to label...
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