Bartleby the Scrivener Essay

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"Bartleby the Scrivener"
Outline
I.Introduction:

A.Plot Overview
B.Thesis Statement: The short story "Bartleby the Scrivener" is very difficult to interpret. However, I am going to interpret what I believe the reader should know for certain about Bartleby and why Melville provides so little explicit information about Bartleby.

II.About Bartleby

A.Bartleby is very complex character
B.He is passively stubborn
C.He looses interest in his work

III.Why Melville provides little information about Bartleby? A.To connect with the reader
B.To leave room for interpretation

IV.Conclusion:
A.Restate thesis
B.Reflections

“Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street”
The short story "Bartleby the Scrivener" is very difficult to interpret. The author uses vague and confusing language to describe the Lawyer’s employee named Bartleby. However, I am going to interpret what I believe the reader should know for certain about Bartleby and why Melville provides so little explicit information about Bartleby.

The short story "Bartleby the Scrivener" centers on a "scrivener" name Bartleby for a law firm. The story is narrated by the Lawyer, who employs Bartleby, and tells the story of his strangest employee Bartleby. The Lawyer has two other scriveners, Turkey and Nippers, and an errand boy, Ginger Nut but finds Bartleby to be the most interesting of all the scriveners. As the story begins, the Lawyer realizes he needs another copyist. Bartleby answers the ad, and the Lawyer hires him. Bartleby writes swiftly and accurately for the first few days. The plot of the story revolves around Bartleby's refusal to carry out his employer's orders. When asked to perform a task, Bartleby frequently responds, "I would prefer not to"(pg.160). This particularly passive form of resistance causes his employer much concern. Eventually, Bartleby refuses to do anything at all and simply stares vacantly at the wall. The narrator's feelings for Bartleby...
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