Barriers to Communication

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 261
  • Published : December 16, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Barriers to Communication
There are many potential barriers to communication that must be recognized by those involved— especially those in supervisory positions.
Possible Barriers:
1. Symbols or words that have different meanings.
Some words mean different things to people depending on background or culture. A large amount of terminology is used in the hospital and misunderstanding is often the cause of problems. (Example: A young radiologic technologist is unaware that supine abdomen x-rays were once called flat plate of the abdomen.)

2. Different values within the group.
Everyone has their own value system and many do not recognize the value of others. (Example: Supervisor may speak with staff about penalties for being late for work. Some students may not value the need to be on time, and may not actively listen to what the supervisor is talking about.)

3. Different perceptions of the problem.
Problems exist in all groups, organizations, and businesses. Problems differ depending on the individual’s perception of the problem.
4. Emphasis on status.
If people in power or higher superiority in the organization consistently remind others of their station, communication will be stifled. Students may hesitate to tell you problems or concerns if you overemphasize your superiority and appear threatening.

5. Conflict of interest.
People may be fearful of change or worried that the change will take away their advantage or invade their territory. This fear may cause people to block communication. 6. Lack of acceptance of differences in points of view, feelings, values, or purposes. Be aware that people have different opinions, feelings, and values. People must be allowed to express feelings and points of view. Accepting input from others promotes growth and cooperation. 7. Feelings of personal insecurity.

Be aware that it is difficult for people to admit feelings of inadequacy. People will not offer information for fear that they may appear ignorant, or they may be defensive when criticized. This may cause difficulty when trying to work with these individuals. Appendix 2H02.02A

Guidelines for Communicating with People with Disabilities
There are no strict rules or regulations regarding communicating with people who have disabilities. These guidelines are an attempt to help increase understanding and to clear up misconceptions. Attitude

1.

Χ
Χ
Χ

Your attitude matters! One of the greatest barriers people with disabilities face is negative attitudes and perceptions of those with disabilities. Sometimes those attitudes are deep-rooted prejudices, based on ignorance and fear. Sometimes they are just unconscious misconceptions that result in impolite or thoughtless acts by otherwise well-meaning people.

Negative attitudes form an obstacle to acceptance and full participation in society for people with disabilities.

Disability

2.

Χ
Χ
Χ

Most people think you are either disabled - or you' not. The truth is that disability is a re
continuum.
At one end are perfect people, and there aren'many of those around. On the other end t
are people with severe impairments.
Most of us fall somewhere in between, and all of us want to be treated with respect.

Assumptions

3.

Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ

Don'assume that a person with a disability needs your help. Ask before you try to help. t
Make eye contact and talk directly to the person in a normal speaking voice. Avoid talking through a disabled person' companion.
s
Don'use words and actions that suggest the person should be treated differently. t
It' OK to ask a person in a wheelchair to go for a walk or to ask a blind person is they s
see what you mean.
Treat people with disabilities with the same respect and consideration you should show all people.

Visual Impairment

4.

Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
5.

When communicating with someone who is blind or visually impaired, be descriptive. You may have to help orient people with visual impairments, and...
tracking img