Banning the "Autobiography of Malcolm X"

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I feel that this novel was banned due to its content of drug use, sex, and crime. Although the novel is not explicit in these areas the subject matter is still present. I also feel that this novel was censored due to its portrayal of racism of both the white man against the black man and the black man against the white man. White people are portrayed as devils and there is a constant theme of separation and discrimination. This book holds ideals that most people may find digressive in the sense that integration is almost no longer an issue, given that people tend to not question a black person’s right to be somewhere just as much as a white mans’. Therefore when this book promotes the evilness of a race and how separation is the only way to achieve equality it endorses ideals we no longer hold as ethical. This book also has in detail how to pull off some different kinds of crimes and hustles. For example, “A good burglary team includes, I knew, what is called a ‘finder.’ A finder is one who locates lucrative places to rob. Another principle need is someone able to ‘case’ these places’ physical layouts—to determine means of entry, the best getaway routes, and so forth” (X 162). This quote is explaining the aspects needed to pull off a robbery easily. It is this type of content that makes this book questionable to public viewing.

Upon reading this book I was unable to understand why it was banned. I realized then that this book is no longer banned for that reason. Today’s society does not view the

content to be of prurient nature and neither do I. Of course I disagree with this book being banned but that is how society has taught me to view it. I find that the value it holds and the lesson’s it teaches exceed the impurity “Malcolm X” may describe. Although he describes how to rob a house he doesn’t do so to teach the reader how to be a thief, his purpose is to bring the reader into the depths and tragedy of his and so many other black men’s lives at the...
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