Banh Mi Thich

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  • Topic: Fermentation, Vietnamese cuisine, Vegetable
  • Pages : 1 (304 words )
  • Download(s) : 150
  • Published : March 23, 2013
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Banh Mi Thit

My favorite snacks are called "bánh mì thịt” from colonial French rule, the baguette is now firmly rooted in the Vietnamese culture. You’ll find almost every Vietnamese restaurant here in town carry a version of this sandwich. Filled with Western ingredients like pâté and butter but with an Asian twist consisting of the variety of meats, pickled vegetables and chili peppers; “bánh mì thịt” literally mean “bread and meat” is an awesome anytime snack. For some odd reason I like to travel the extends, just to get all the ingredients, to make bánh mì thịt the way I would enjoy. First, I drove all the way to Lee Sandwich in Chandler, obtain the plain baguettes because they are the best in the area. I had tried many baguette in our local oriental markets here in town but they lack the quality and pristine of its originated. Next, I drove to Me Cong market in Mesa to acquire all the ingredients needed. There, I got Vietnamese pickled vegetable in a jug that consist of thin slices Carrot and Radish, one pound of pork shoulder cut, pâté in the cans, Maggi soy sauces, and cilantro. Then, the best part of all, after going through a great length, to get all the ingredients to create bánh mì thịt, is to make it. The smell of cooking pork on the grill plus the aroma of bread heating up in the oven can't be describe but just mouth-watering. Finally, everything has cooked and prepare. The baguette is now packed with pâté, grilled pork, vegetables pickled, cilantro and a few drops of Maggi soy sauce, are now calling bánh mì thịt. A bite after bites into it crunchy crush of baguette, worth the time and length quell my craving for the snack bánh mì thịt.
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