Bamya- Egyptian Food

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Egypt, Nile, Cairo
  • Pages : 3 (863 words )
  • Download(s) : 104
  • Published : November 18, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Food and Nutrition ISP

World cuisine

Egypt

Alex Easton

The news of the Egyptian or lotus revolution has headed the media world-wide a few months ago. An uprising of the middle class Egyptians has led to overthrow the notorious Hosny Mubarak who had reigned Egypt for 30 long years. The Egyptians have overcome their fear of authority and had reached the point of no return. Unemployment, poverty, hungry and poor Egyptians now seek a better future for their country and for themselves.

The Arab Republic of Egypt is a link between Africa, Europe and Asia. Egypt is located in the northeastern region of the African continent. Egypt has three major water resources, the river Nile, the longest river in the world, the Mediterranean Sea and the Red sea, however, only the river Nile provides palatable drinking water.

Despite this, Egypt's climate is arid and dry and most of the country receives less than one inch of rainfall each year. The Mediterranean Sea may offer Egypt's northern coastline up to eight inches of rainfall each year, and keeps year –round temperatures cooler than the inland deserts. The widespread lack of rainfall makes it extremely difficult to grow crops. Egypt has no forests and only 2 percent of the land can be farmed.

The river Nile runs from the south to the north of eastern Egypt and empties into the Mediterranean Sea at the delta, the most fertile land in Egypt. Around 95 percent of the countries population lives alongside the Nile River, including about 3 percent of Egypt's population in its capital, Cairo. This overcrowding is threatening Egypt's wildlife, recourses and water supply.

The Egyptians still have a love of food inherited from their ancestors. Living on a fertile land that yields different fruits and vegetables all year round has enriched the Egyptian kitchen with a variety of...
tracking img