Bahay Kubo

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UNIVERSITY OF SANTO TOMAS
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE
BAHAY KUBO REPORT

LIM, CHESTER JAKE SY
TULIAO, THEODORE MOSES
CARLOS, LYLA SAMANTHA
UY, VIVIAN

3 AR 6

MAM AVENDANO

Our National Shelter

The bahay kubo is an icon of Philippine culture as it represents "bayanihan" - a spirit of communal unity or effort to achieve a particular objective.

Bahay kubo or nipa hut is the indigenous house used by the natives of Philippines. Traditional construction materials are bamboo tied together and covered with a thatched roof using nipa or anahaw leaves.

Architectural State

This architectural masterpiece is efficient in every way. Abundance of natural light and ventilation, cost efficient, space efficient and most importantly, can be moved to different places. Green architecture's epitome.

This style of house has been used in the Philippines even before the Spaniards arrived to our homeland; and is still used even till today especially in rural areas.

Exterior Design

Being made with anahaw and bamboo, it gives off a warm homey feeling. Every aspect of the exterior simply blends in with nature, as the design is with the elements rather than against it.

Interior Design

A typical bahay kubo only has one, large, open, multi-purpose room for dwelling, called bulwagan. It has a cellar, called silong where most household chores are done. This area serves as the area for livestock pens, storage space, workspace and granary. The walls are made of nipa and cogon leaves or sawali or woven bamboo, and there are large windows on all sides, which keep the interior well-ventilated. The windows have tungkod or “legs” that hold the swinging shades open during the day, and secure it back in place at night. Another feature of the the bahay kubo is ladder or hagdan which can easily be removed at night or when the...
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