Avedon Fashion Photography Exhibit

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Cultural Event Report:

The current event I decided to write my report on was the Avedon Fashion Photography Exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. This exhibit is a temporary one and will be held in the museum until January 17, 2011. Photographer Richard Avedon between the years 1944-2000 shot the photos used. He is considered to be one of the behind the lense the twentieth century. He was the modern push that made fashion photography what it is today. Avedon used women as his subjects in imaginative portraits. These images impacted society because they showed women in a new light. His work had a hard influence on other photographers in the world because he set tone a new style.

When walking into the exhibit, the first photo I saw was a colored close up of a woman from the neck up. Around the crown of her face was a florescent pink oval with the artists name written in bright green cursive. The model named Jean Shrimpton has a subtle but shocked look on her face. With dark eyebrows and eye make up, her bold blue eyes pop out and her cherry red lips are puckered in contrast. This photograph was used as the cover of April 1965’s issue of popular fashion magazine called Harper’s Bazaar. Go down the side vertically in large font was the word fashion. Also near the frontal piece was a wall with a statement Richard Avedon said about his career.

Besides that one ceiling to floor-sized image, a lot of the photos were in black and white. The exhibit it self was also black, white, and very clean cut with the font on the wall being colorless and the walls being brighter than fresh snow. To the left of the entrance is where the beginnings of Avedon’s artwork started in 1944. Continuing around the whole room counter clockwise, his work evolved and modernized to 2000. It was very interesting because the photographs were almost timeless, they did slightly change over time. In the first pictures, the women were dressed pretty conservatively....
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