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HISTORY OF CHEVROLET

Type - Division
Industry - Automotive
Founded - November 3, 1911 Founder(s) Louis Chevrolet
William C. Durant
Headquarters - Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
Products Automobiles
Owner(s) General Motors Company
Website WWW.CHEVROLET.COM
Chevrolet also known as Chevy , is an American brand of vehicle produced by General Motors (GM). Chevrolet was founded by Louis Chevrolet and ousted GM founder William C. Durant on November 3, 1911, Durant incorporated the Chevrolet Motor Company on November 3, 1911. Louis Chevrolet was not an officer, but he experimented with large luxury cars while Chevrolet Motor Company's Little brand sold lower-priced cars against Ford. The first "production" Chevrolet was the Classic Six of 1912, but the first Chevys, as we know them, were the 1914 Royal Mail roadster and Baby Grand touring car Louis Chevrolet left his namesake company to return to racing. The 1916 Chevrolet Four-Ninety was Durant's direct shot at the Ford Model T. By now, Chevy was thriving with factories in places like Flint and New York City. Its success gave Durant the footing to buy up GM stock, with help from the DuPont family and a New York bank president, Louis J. Kaufman. Durant staged a coup d’état, and on September 16, 1915, GM's seventh anniversary, took control of GM again. On December 23, 1915, Chevrolet stockholders increased capitalization from 20 million to million, Gustin writes, and used the $60 million to buy up GM stock. Chevrolet bought GM. It wasn't the other way around. Panics, recessions, and depressions swung wilder and were frequent then. By late 1920, amid another severe downturn, GM ousted Durant for the last time. Here's what happened next: 1922: William S. Knudsen leaves Ford as head of manufacturing to become Chevrolet's production chief and later, vice president of operations. In '24, he vows to match Ford "one for one" in sales. 1923: Chevy's Copper Cooled models feature air-cooled engines. It proves a rare engineering blunder by Charles Kettering. Only 759 are produced, 500 make it to dealers and 100 are sold. 1927: President Alfred Sloan hires California custom coachbuilder Harley Earl to head up GM's new Art & Color department. Even at the low end of Sloan's price ladder, Chevy becomes known for style and annual model updates. 1929: Chevrolet introduces the Stovebolt Six "for the price of a four" displacing 194 cubic inches and making 46 horsepower. 1936: Model year for the first Suburban Carryall, an eight-passenger truck-based utility passenger wagon. 1947: Chevrolet works on a compact, called Cadet, then shelves plans because Americans have no reason or desire to buy small cars. 1950: Model year Power glide is first offered, beating Ford and Plymouth to the market as the first low-priced brand with a fully automatic transmission. 1953: The Corvette appears in January at GM's Motormen at New York's Waldorf-Astoria hotel. Production begins in Flint half a year later. 1955: Model year introduction of Chevrolet's first V-8 in 37 years. Ed Cole had brought Small Block to production in just 28 months in "Motorama-styled" models. The Tri-Five Belt Airs later become some of the most collectible cars extant. 1959: Model year for the all-new Impala, Bel Air, and Biscayne with radical, horizontal rear fins. A proposal for an air-cooled, rear-engine V-8 Impala did not get past the exploration stages. 1960: Model year for Chevrolet's first in a series of failed world-class small cars, the Corvair, with its air-cooled, rear-mounted flat six 1961: Semon E. "Bunkie" Knudsen, son of William S., leaves Pontiac to become Chevy chief. His Impala Super Sports compete with Pontiac's sportier full-size models. 1965: U.S. auto and light truck sales top 15 million for the first time in history, and two- and four-door Impalas account for 803,400. All told, Chevy sells more than 1 million Impalas,...
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