Autism Inside Education

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Autism inside Education

Danisha Lyons

English 120
Dr. O’Shea
November 29, 2007

History: Autism in General
Autism causes kids to experience the world in a different way than most other kids do. Many kids with autism cannot communicate without special help and tend to keep to themselves. They normally react to what's going on around them in remarkable ways It may be extremely hard for kids with autism to make connections that other kids make easily. “For example, when someone smiles, you know the smiling person is happy or being friendly. But a kid with autism may have trouble connecting that smile with the person's happy feelings.” (Burdo-Hartman, 2004) Children who have autism tend to have trouble relating words with the correct meanings. “Autism causes kids to act in unusual ways. They might flap their hands, say certain words over and over, have temper tantrums, or play only with one particular toy. Most kids with autism don't like changes in routines. They like to stay on a schedule that is always the same. They also may insist that their toys or other objects be arranged a certain way and get upset if these items are moved or disturbed.” (Burdo-Harman, 2004) A person with autism brain has trouble with important jobs: making common sense of the world. Our brain interprets the sights, sounds, smells, and other sensations that are experienced. If our brain was not able to help understand certain things, everyone would have trouble performing, talking, going to school, and doing other normal stuff. The Risk of Autism

Assessing the Risk

Weighing the Risk of Autism within the General Education Classroom

Educating all Teachers: Working with Autistic Students
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