Auteur Theory

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  • Topic: Film director, Stanley Kubrick, 2001: A Space Odyssey
  • Pages : 1 (329 words )
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  • Published : February 7, 2012
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Auteur Theory
Auteur theory is often seen that it was created in 1954 by Francois Truffaunt who wrote an essay titled A Certain Tendency in French Cinema. In his essay he stated that film directors would often use this medium to express their own ideas and opinions and that the director is the one who heavily influences the film. This meant that Francois believed that the director should always be considered as an auteur. He once famous stated that “There are no good and bad movies, only good and bad directors”, which strengthens his theory of how directors have a major impact on film. Auteur theory often shows that the best films have a “signature” that comes from the director’s personality and work. It is said that if you watch more than one film or production from the same director, you can see similarities, whether it’s visual or just the feel of the film. This kind of theory can also be put to practice with actors, often films of the same kind of genre with the same actors be compared easily. In the same way that an author uses a pen to write books, it is said that directors use film equipment to create their work with their own ideas and opinions. The equipment used across different films can also be similar and show how auteur theory can be put into practice. An example of this would be Stanley Kubrick. Although his films vary in genre, the camera work and the actual visual quality of the film have similarities. Stanley’s most famous films were all created around the same time, with 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and A Clockwork Orange (1971), the visual quality is high in both of these films and can be compared with media created decades later. This goes to show just how far Stanley Kubrick went to give his works of art a quality signature of approval, making him an auteur.
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