Australian Water Crisis

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The importance of water: The earth’s surface is two-thirds covered by water. Only 1% of this water is usable to us. This 1% of the world’s water supply is a important aspect for our survival. As the human body is also 75% made up of water, it is evident that water is one of the main elements responsible for life on earth. Water circulates through the land just as it does in the human body. Dehydration will kill the human rave faster than starvation. As the plants and animals we eat also depend on water, the lack of this could cause both dehydration and starvation. Not all water that looks drinkable is, as it may contain harmful elements leading to disease or even death. Almost everything relies on a water source. The processes involved in water management: Include a mis ox both policy and investment options. Policy options recognize or take advantage of the linkages between groundwater and surface water resources. Investment options involve on-ground work. Exmaples include:

Policy Options:
Licencing and allocation
Water trading
Risk management
Management zones
Land use planning
Institutional arrangements
Communication

Investment Options:
Water banking
Water interception
Water supplementing
Land use
Water quality

Australia’s water usage: 2007 statistics – water consumption

Impact of water crisis: Economic:
-Costs and losses to agricultural producers
-Cost and losses to livestock producers
-Loss from timber production
-Loss from fishery production
-Loss to recreation and tourism industry
-Energy-related effects
-Decline in food production
-Rural population loss

Environmental:
-Damage to animal species
-Hydrological effects
-Damage to plant communities
-Increased number of severity of fires
-Wind and water erosion
-Reduced soil quality
-Air quality effects
-Visual and landscape quality

Social:
-Health/Disease
-Reduced quality of life, changes in lifestyle
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