Australia's Regional and Global Links (Aid & Tourism)

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Aid
In international affairs, aid (also known as international aid, overseas aid, or foreign aid) is a voluntary transfer of resources from one country to another, given at least partly with the purpose of benefiting the beneficiary country.

The three main types of aid are:
* Voluntary aid - assistance provided by NGO’s (Non-Government Organizations) * Bilateral aid - all forms of aid given from one government to another * Multilateral aid - all forms of aid given from international agencies (e.g. UN)

Trade can take various forms, for e.g.
* Tied Aid (could be used to build infrastructure or purchase goods from the donor country) * Untied Aid (the receiving country can choose to spend the money as it sees right) * Food Aid (emergency food supplies are donated [Australia has given food aid to countries such as Iraq & Sudan]) * Technical Assistance (Expert personnel move into a developing country to assist in development programs) * Emergency Aid (Essentials and medical services are provided in response to a natural or human disaster, such as earthquake or civil war)

The role of the Government and Non-Government organisations
Aid is provided both by the government and non-government agencies. Overseas development assistance is the official form of government aid. This can be in the form of loans or grants. Non-Government aid comes in two main forms; they are Voluntary to religious organisations and non-government organisations (NGOs), such as the Red Cross, World Vision and Care Australia; and from banks and financial institutions that give loans to make a profit.

The map above shows us which countries receive aid via AusAID.

AusAID

AusAID is well known managing the majority of Australia’s Aid program. AusAID focuses on the Asia Pacific region, but also provides assistance to Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean.  Aid to Africa has also increased significantly in recent years and now represents around five per cent of the aid program. Indonesia

Australia and Indonesia work together to reduce poverty and promote regional peace, stability and prosperity. To achieve this, Australian aid focuses on the following areas: * Education & Scholarships: Australia supports Indonesia’s commitment to provide access to quality education for all of its children. * Health: Australia is working with Indonesia to strengthen its health systems, improve the health of its women and children, halt the spread of HIV and address infectious diseases and pandemics. * Infrastructure: Australia is working with Indonesia to address critical infrastructure needs, including improving national roads and providing access to safe water and sanitation. * Democratic Governance: Australia is supporting Indonesia‘s reform efforts to strengthen its legal, democratic and oversight institutions, including civil society organisations. * Economic Governance: Australia is supporting Indonesia's efforts to improve economic policies and public finance management and to strengthen financial institutions. * Decentralisation: Australia is contributing to poverty reduction in Indonesia through improved local governance and service delivery. * Gender: Australia’s development assistance to Indonesia recognises that both men and women have a role to play in all aspects of development * Rural Productivity: Australian aid in Indonesia is increasing incomes for the poor in sustainable ways. * Disaster Risk Reduction: Australia is contributing to poverty reduction in Indonesia through improved local governance and service delivery. * Climate Change: Australia is supporting Indonesia’s efforts to reduce greenhouse emissions from deforestation and to better protect and manage its forests.

Australia is funding the construction and expansion of 2000 junior secondary schools in Indonesia's poorer areas. This will create 330,000 school places for 13-15 year olds (Photo:...
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