Aurora Leigh

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Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Aurora Leigh.
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> Elizabeth Barrett Browning was one of England’s most renown female poets. She was most famous for her rebellious and righteous ideals on reformation and feminism. Elizabeth Barrett Browning uses her life’s odyssey as a muse to express influential sentiments of love and feminism in her masterpiece “Aurora Leigh” which continues to inspire and shape young women of today. >

> The background story and experience the famous female poet draws from begins with her birth. Elizabeth Moulton Barrett Browning’s was born on March 6th, 1806 in Durham, England was born into the family of Mary Graham Clarke and Edward Moulton Barrett She was the oldest out of eleven children and was also her father’s favorite child. Not only was she the great-granddaughter of a West-Indian slaver, but also her father was an investor in colonial Jamaica. Not much is known about the Barrett Browning’s mother, because she makes little to no appearances in Barrett’s works. >

> While the males in Barrett Browning's family received school education, she began to read heavy tomes at a young age. She taught herself Greek, Latin, and Hebrew with the aid of her brother’s tutor. Her father would bring her epic poems such as The Rape of the Lock, Dante's Infermo, and Paradise Lost. >

> At age fifteen she developed the first of her health problems, which negatively affected her throughout her adult life. She had weak lungs, a chronic cough, and a nervous disorder. As a teenager she suffered a spinal injury when she fell off of a horse. Because of her illness she was able to spend time reading and writing. Her father supported her in her writing, even paying to publish her first work, the epic poem The Battle of Marathon. In 1821, she fell ill with a nervous collapse, but recovered. Twelve years later, she suffered from hemorrhaging of the left lung and relocated for three years of recovery. After the drowning of her favorite brother, her conditioned worsened and she condemn herself into being a sequestered lethargic. She became even more depressed and introverted. In her immeasurable grief over the loss of her brother, she described herself as “dead before death”. Incapacitated for months, she returned to her family’s house in London and spent the next 5 years bedridden.

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> The poet’s father grew more and more possessive after the death of her mother in 1828 and forced a belief on Elizabeth that she was helpless and doomed. Her father had never wanted any of his children to marry Complicating herself self-image was and addiction to morphia that quelled excrutiating muscle spasms and the opiates that the doctors had prescribed her. The sequestered Elizabeth Barrett Browning devoted the majority of her time writing. >

> Elizabeth Barrett Browning captured the eyes of Robert Browning when she wrote a line praising one of his works in “Lady Geraldine’s Courtship”. Once he noticed it, he became infatuated with her works. He would visit her and bring her favorite flowers, the latest gossip from London, and stories from his journeys to Italy. Like Desdemona from Othello, Elizabeth was "bewitched" by his stories, and found his small talk enthralling. From what she knew as a dismal, and despairing room, He brightened her dark home, and excited her imagination. Against her father's wishes, they secretly eloped to Florence, Italy in 1846. Once her father received word of the secret marriage, he never forgave her; enraged and devastated, her father disowned and disinherited her. Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning concieved one child who was known as Robert W. "Pennini" Browning. >

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> Little is known about Elizabeth Barrett Browning's death in June 29, 1861 . Some scholars believe her death was related to the amount of opiate intake the doctors had prescribed her, others say that a lung infection that was...
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