Auden an the Greeks

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 179
  • Published : August 12, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Examining W.H. Auden and the Greeks
HUM 2000 Introduction to Humanities
Steven Malloris
John Superczynski
Indiana Tech

“Had Greek civilization never existed... we would never have become fully conscious, which is to say that we would never have become, for better or worse, fully human.” this quote is for W.H. Auden, who was a prolific writer and plat write. In this paper I will endeavor to give insight about the author of this quote, the origins of this piece, and what the author meant in writhing it. As well as examples of proof that Auden's theory was true or not. And finally I will give my opinion whether I feel that Auden quote is correct. To start with a short back ground on the author Wystan Hugh Auden he was born in York, England, in 1907. He moved to Birmingham during childhood and was educated at Christ Church, Oxford. As a young man he was influenced by the poetry of Thomas Hardy, Robert Frost, William Blake, Emily Dickinson, as well as old English verse,(http://www.poets.org ). Auden seem to have always had a fascination with the ancient Greeks having been educated at a young age on the teaching of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle . Auden's love of the ancient Greeks would in later life place him in the category as a Grecophile: ( a lover of all things Greek). This love of Ancient Greek; teachings, and traditions I'm sure this led to Auden's viewpoint of how the Greeks contributed to modern civilization.

In researching Auden's line about the Ancient Greek's and their contributions to are modern day society I found that the line is taken from a larger writing entitled: ‘The Greeks and Us’ in Forewords and Afterwords, (W. H. Auden, New York, 1973, p. 32). The Quote is: “I can think of no better way of indicating what we owe to Greece than drawing distinctions, for of all intellectual acts, that is perhaps the most characteristically...
tracking img