Attitudes Towards Test Tube Babies

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Attitudes towards Test Tube Babies

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Name of Student: Yuhan Huang (Sheley)

AE teacher: Michelle Crockford

AE Class: February 4

Abstract

The objective of this report is to present the attitudes and ideas shared by International Education Services Limited (IES) students and students from the university of Queensland (UQ) in relation to their knowledge and personal opinions concerning Invitro fertilization The survey used data collected from male and female students between the ages of 15 and 30 living in the State of Queensland. The participants were given 20 questions to answer in privacy and without any degree of pressure. The questions related to their personal details and to the IVF program in particular.

The aim of the investigation was to gather an overall point of view as to whether IVF was indeed seen as an accepted type of program among this age group.

In conclusion it is reasonable to think that another survey with an older more experienced age group would more likely give a variation in results. Because this selected age group were students, their knowledge and experience directly with IVF was limited. However, it is important to recoginse the opinions of youth as they are the future generation of adults.

Introduction

In recent years, babies conceived through in-vitro fertilization (IVF) have been a topic of moral discussion around the world. This form of reproduction is not considered a natural and acceptable way of giving birth in some people’s eyes. Many infertile couples in particular, rely on this new technology since it allows them the choice of having their baby using this method.

In-vitro fertilization is defined by, “a process by which egg cells are fertilised by sperm outside the womb (Papanikolaou et al. 2006)”.

The definition of a test tube baby is one which is the result of a female ovary or egg having been fertilised with a male sperm inside a test tube, the resulting impregnated egg is implanted in the uterus of a female, growing into a foetus and developing baby by the time of birth. (Muffin, 2007). According to Walsh (2008), three million test tube babies have been born throughout the world in this way so far, and this number continues to increase at a rate of eleven thousand each year.

In 1978, the world’s first successful “test-tube” baby, Louise Brown, was born in Great Britain. The baby girl weighed five-pound 12- ounces and was delivered early via Caesarean section. The process had been a success; this process proved Dr. Steptoe and Dr. Edwards had accomplished the first of many test tube babies (Rosenberg, 1970). In Australia, the first test tube baby, Candice Elizabeth Reed, was born in 1980 (Screen Australia, 1982).

Infertility afflicts thousand’s of married couples feeling frustration at being childless. In India, there is an infertility clinic which provides moral, emotional and the most advanced technical support for couples wishing to solve their fertility issues. However, the religion of Islam is totally against IVF and has been banned by the by Islamic Fiqh Council (1986). In addition, they thought that in-vitro fertilization was unlawful because it could result in confusion with regard to parentage (Islamic Perspective, 2007).  

Prior to the birth of the first test tube babies such as Louise Brown, people worldwide were hesitant to use this method thinking that there could be risks involved.  However, in time the health and well being of those babies born through IVF programs have proven to the world that this method is indeed safe.  Hence the fears have almost disappeared. However, many people still have many misconceptions about a test tube baby and some countries do not allow the manufacturing of test tube babies.  If a baby can be created in a test tube, then infertile...
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