Attitude Survey

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Attitude Survey
Psy/475
April 7, 2013

Attitude Survey
How an individual dresses impacts how he or she is perceived in the eyes of others. Often times, the way an individual appears in public leaves him or her open to becoming labeled either favorably or unfavorably. Members of society will often judge an individual’s appearance therefore denying any opportunity to know the “inner person.” In today’s society, some of the socially acceptable ways to dress seem to include wearing pajamas in public venues, wearing revealing outfits, and wearing pants so low that one’s underwear is clearly visible. The contents of this paper discuss attitudes and whether or not wearing such outfits is acceptable in society, in workplaces, and in schools. Topic Relevance

With every decade come changes in social attitudes along with changing clothing styles. An individual could look back through history and observe young adults in the 1950s dressed in tailored suits, long skirts, classic styles, and much more modesty (Klien, 2008). Although styles were modest, people began to slowly change their perspectives on what was considered beautiful or acceptable. Throughout the 60s and 70s, young adults began to think more outside the box. During this time, music groups greatly influenced the young generation’s choice in clothing and freedom of speech. Young adults began to dress in more provocative styles, sometimes baring more skin and leaving a little less to the imagination. Although not as provocative as today’s society, the 60s propelled fashion in a new direction and became an influence on generations yet to come. In today’s society, many people find that wearing clothing in public venues that was once offensive, sloppy, or revealing to be socially acceptable. Today, many people view wearing pajamas out in public as comfortable, baring midriffs as beautiful, and sagging pants as a sign of solidarity and freedom.

In today’s society, one can find an example of individuals wearing clothes in ways that once were unfashionable and unacceptable almost anywhere. Simply by sitting in a public park or visiting a shopping mall and observing people for an hour will give one a glimpse of today’s “fads.” The media also has an effect on society. For example, women on television are often viewed baring their midriffs or wearing revealing clothing. Such images therefore give society the impression that such ways of dressing are not only appropriate but also appealing to the opposite sex and ideal standards for appearance (Want, Vickers, & Amos, 2008). On the other hand, popular social media websites such, as People of Walmart depict individuals seen shopping at Walmart as inappropriately dressed, unappealing, and lazy. What is an attitude?

Psychologists define an attitude as an opinion or belief, feelings, and behaviors about a group of individuals, objects, or situations (Culbertson, 1968). In addition, an attitude can be either positive or negative; for or against someone or something. Hogan (2007) explains that “there are a virtually unlimited number of attitudes.” Therefore, measuring attitudes plays an important role in social psychology. Several methods of measuring attitudes are available to help gain insight on various opinions, feelings, and behaviors. Preliminary Design

The purpose of a survey conducted on today’s style of clothing is to gain insight from various groups of people to measure acceptance levels. Because the topic covers a large area of clothing preferences, it was a challenge to figure out the best way to administer the survey. It has been decided that the survey is most useful in school systems and as part of a pre-employment screenings. In schools, the survey could help schools determine if a student dress code or uniform policy is needed. As part of a pre-employment test, employers may gain insight on a perspective employee’s level of professionalism. Special accommodations for individuals taking this survey are...
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