Atticus Finch

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Atticus Finch

Miss Caroline Fisher tells Scout Finch that her father does not know how to teach. Mrs. Fisher was wrong in every sense of the word. Atticus Finch was not only a teacher but an example of what he taught.

I think Miss Maudie said it best when Describing Atticus, “He’s the same in his house as he is on the public streets.” (87) He was an honorable and upstanding gentleman, someone whom everyone looked up to. He teaches his children the biblical principal that all men are created equal and then shows that he believes it in the courtroom when he points out that yes, black men can commit crimes but, “this is a truth that applies to the human race and to no particular race of men.” (208)He knows that Tom is being accused because he’s black and not because he’s guilty. He’s willing to stand for him.

Atticus is a strong parent and is loved by his children. He teaches them very valuable lessons in life in two ways. One way that he teaches his children valuable lessons is by giving them something to think about and decide what they think is true. After explaining to his children that mockingbirds are peaceful and don’t harm anyone or anything, he tells them “Shoot all the blue jays that you want, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”

The second way that I think Atticus teaches children and others is by what he does. Atticus brings truth to the statement “Actions speak louder than words.” Atticus teaches his children to look past skin color when he defends Tom in a court case. He teaches his children to see things through even when they know that they won’t work out perfectly in the end. He teaches them by being an example of what he says.

Works Cited :

Lee, Harper. To Kill A Mockingbird.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. J. B. Lippincott & Co. 1960
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