Atomicity

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  • Topic: ACID, Database transaction, Transaction processing
  • Pages : 5 (1412 words )
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  • Published : May 25, 2013
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Characteristics
Atomicity
Main article: Atomicity (database systems)

Atomicity requires that each transaction is "all or nothing": if one part of the transaction fails, the entire transaction fails, and the database state is left unchanged. An atomic system must guarantee atomicity in each and every situation, including power failures, errors, and crashes. To the outside world, a committed transaction appears (by its effects on the database) to be indivisible ("atomic"), and an aborted transaction does not happen. Consistency

Main article: Consistency (database systems)

The consistency property ensures that any transaction will bring the database from one valid state to another. Any data written to the database must be valid according to all defined rules, including but not limited to constraints, cascades, triggers, and any combination thereof. This does not guarantee correctness of the transaction in all ways the application programmer might have wanted (that is the responsibility of application-level code) but merely that any programming errors do not violate any defined rules. Isolation

Main article: Isolation (database systems)

The isolation property ensures that the concurrent execution of transactions results in a system state that would be obtained if transactions were executed serially, i.e. one after the other. Providing isolation is the main goal of concurrency control. Depending on concurrency control method, the effects of an incomplete transaction might not even be visible to another transaction.[citation needed] Durability

Main article: Durability (database systems)

Durability means that once a transaction has been committed, it will remain so, even in the event of power loss, crashes, or errors. In a relational database, for instance, once a group of SQL statements execute, the results need to be stored permanently (even if the database crashes immediately thereafter). To defend against power loss, transactions (or their effects) must be recorded in a non-volatile memory. Examples

The following examples further illustrate the ACID properties. In these examples, the database table has two fields, A and B, in two records. An integrity constraint requires that the value in A and the value in B must sum to 100. The following SQL code creates a table as described above:

CREATE TABLE acidtest (A INTEGER, B INTEGER CHECK (A + B = 100));

Atomicity failure

Assume that a transaction attempts to subtract 10 from A and add 10 to B. This is a valid transaction, since the data continue to satisfy the constraint after it has executed. However, assume that after removing 10 from A, the transaction is unable to modify B. If the database retained A's new value, atomicity and the constraint would both be violated. Atomicity requires that both parts of this transaction, or neither, be complete. Consistency failure

Consistency is a very general term which demands that the data must meet all validation rules. In the previous example, the validation is a requirement that A + B = 100. Also, it may be inferred that both A and B must be integers. A valid range for A and B may also be inferred. All validation rules must be checked to ensure consistency.

Assume that a transaction attempts to subtract 10 from A without altering B. Because consistency is checked after each transaction, it is known that A + B = 100 before the transaction begins. If the transaction removes 10 from A successfully, atomicity will be achieved. However, a validation check will show that A + B = 90, which is inconsistent with the rules of the database. The entire transaction must be cancelled and the affected rows rolled back to their pre-transaction state. If there had been other constraints, triggers, or cascades, every single change operation would have been checked in the same way as above before the transaction was committed. Isolation failure

To demonstrate isolation, we assume two transactions execute at the same...
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