Atlantic Charter and Its Affect in Wwii

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  • Topic: World War II, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Allies of World War II
  • Pages : 2 (485 words )
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  • Published : February 27, 2013
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Atlantic Charter
The Atlantic Charter was an incredibly important policy that would have an impact on the entire world from the moment it was drafted by Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt in August of 1941 to the present day and beyond. The two men met in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, hence the name Atlantic Charter, during World War 2. While it is called the Atlantic Charter, it was technically a joint declaration by the two world leaders and as such not a formal legal document. A few months later the Charter would be agreed upon by all the Allied Nations. It was important both for the specifics included in the document as well as the symbolism of Roosevelt producing the Charter with Churchill. It was more of a set of goals than a specific blueprint and it contained 8 key principles: 1. Renunciation of territorial aggression

2. Opposition to territorial changes without consent of the peoples concerned 3. Support for the right of people to choose their own government 4. Access to raw materials for all nations
5. Support of efforts to improve the economic condition of people throughout the world 6. Freedom from fear and want
7. Freedom of the seas
8. Disarmament of aggressors
The Atlantic Charter was completely opposite the actions of the Axis Powers, who were expanding their territory and conquering territory all across the world. The principles set out in the Atlantic Charter would provide a basis for international cooperation and international law. It would also provide a foundation for important economic agreements throughout the world that were strong enough to withstand times when countries might oppose each other on one matter but still need to trade. It would also help in creating boundaries and dealing with the aftermath of the war. From the start of the war in Europe, the United States had maintained a neutral stance. While Franklin D. Roosevelt himself was openly sympathic to the Allies, the American public was opposed...
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