Assumptions and Fallacies

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Associate Level Material

Appendix D

Assumptions and Fallacies

Write a 150- to 200-word response to each of the following questions:

• What are assumptions? How do you think assumptions might interfere with critical thinking? What might you do to avoid making assumptions in your thinking?

An assumption is something you take for granted, without any thought. A judgment is an opinion formed, based on facts. It requires thought. It’s best to be careful when making assumptions about people. Assumptions interfere with critical thinking by assumptions is a key factor because they give you quite a bit to think critically about! In your critical thinking, you need to take any assumptions you have and question them as you try to substantiate them or unsubstantiated them. With critical thinking and assumptions, it's also important to understand what an inference is and how it relates to the entire process. A conclusion you come to in your mind based on something else that is true or you believe to be true. When it comes to avoiding assumptions in my thinking I would first not jump to think one way. I would research the information or take a look at everything before I decided one way or another.

What are fallacies? How are fallacies used in written, oral, and visual arguments? What might you do to avoid fallacies in your thinking?

Fallacies are mistakes of reasoning, as opposed to making mistakes that are of a factual nature. Fallacies of inappropriate presumption: cases where we have an assumption or a question presupposing something that is not reasonable to accept in the relevant conversational context. Fallacies are used in written, oral and visual arguments by using them to get the reader to focus more on the topic we are writing about. We use them to get the reader to agree with what we are trying to explain. Make them sway toward our description of what we believe may be true. When it comes to avoiding using fallacies in my...
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