Assignment - Quality Control & Quality Assurance

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Quality Management

Quality Assurance and Control

Table of Contents

Introduction2
Importance of Quality in Organisations3
Customers3
Continuous Improvement4
Waste Reduction Culture5
Quality Assurance & Quality Control6
Quality Assurance6
Quality Control7
Differences between Assurance and Control7
Quality Control & Assurance Control Mechanisms8
Key Performance Indicators8
Integrate Quality into Employee Objectives9
Training9
Conclusion10
Bibliography11

Introduction

This assignment will discuss what the term ‘quality’ means to an organisation. It will also detail the key differences between quality control and quality assurance, giving examples to support the findings. The management of quality within an organisation is pivotal to remaining in a strong market position against your competitors, and this is another topic that will be discussed later in this assignment. Finally, identification and examples of the various control mechanisms that can be put in place to ensure quality is effectively and efficiently managed within a project are included.

“Quality Management is the key business improvement strategy and the key management issue of the future because it is essential for efficiency and competitiveness” Hakes, C (1991, p.3). This demonstrates how important quality management is to an organisation from a strategic viewpoint, and suggests that quality must be managed appropriately for business growth and profitability.

APM BOK (2006) defines quality management as “the discipline that is applied to ensure that both the outputs of the project and the processes by which the outputs are delivered meet the required needs of the stakeholders”. This definition looks at quality management from an internal point of view, suggesting that the processes used to deliver the required outputs must be robust and effective, and that this will enable a project to meet the needs of its customers.

Importance of Quality in Organisations

Quality in an organisation can ‘make or break’ various products and services. Any deficiencies of quality can affect a business’ ability to grow and prosper in the marketplace. Some elements of what quality means to an organisation are listed below, these can be driven by both internal and external requirements:

• Customers (internal / external)

• Continuous improvement of products / processes (internal)

• Leadership and Teamwork (internal)

Customers

The effective management of quality can have both positive and negative effects on the reputation of an organisation. Hakes, C (1991, p.11) states, “successful organisations realise that a major factor in total quality improvement is monitoring performance in meeting or exceeding customer requirements”. If customer requirements are met / exceeded, this can have a positive affect on the organisations reputation, and could potentially lead to repeat custom.

Hakes, C (1991, p.12) also suggests that meeting customer requirements stems from meeting internal expectations across the organisation, ‘quality management’ “demonstrates the responsibility that everyone in the organisation has to contribute to quality by satisfying their internal customer so that, ultimately, the external customer is satisfied”.

As well as ensuring customers are retained, and repeat business is captured, Leech, C (2011, p.6) states that quality management is also important to “attract new customers”. She then goes on to identify that “increased national and international competition means organisations must strive to perform better than their main competitors”. This element of quality management affects the organisations ability to attract...
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