Assignment; Bias, Rhetorical Devices, Argumentation

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An example of bias within this speech would be: “to point out and make public the dishonesty, the downright villainy, of Boss Jim W. Gettys' political machine -- now in complete control of the government of this state! One example of fallacies that I found in this speech was; “Now, however, I have something more than a hope. And Jim Gettys -- Jim Gettys has something less than a chance. Every straw vote, every independent poll shows that I'll be elected. Now I can afford to make some promises!” Some rhetorical devices found in this speech were:

Alliteration: “Now, however, I have something more than a hope. And Jim Gettys -- Jim Gettys has something less than a chance. Every straw vote, every independent poll shows that I'll be elected. Now I can afford to make some promises!” •Alliteration: ”The working man -- The working man and the slum child know they can expect my best efforts in their interests. The decent, ordinary citizens know that I'll do everything in my power to protect the underprivileged, the underpaid, and the the underfed!” •Alliteration: “Here's one promise I'll make, and boss Jim Gettys knows I'll keep it:…” •Hyperbole: “with one purpose only: to point out and make public the dishonesty, the downright villainy, of Boss Jim W. Gettys' political machine -- now in complete control of the government of this State!” •Paradox: “Well, I'd make my promises now if I weren't too busy arranging to keep them.”

The speaker addressed arguments in the first paragraph of the speech by stating that because of Jim Gettys “control” he had no hope of being elected. In the second paragraph however, he reinforces that he is being elected by stating, “ Now I can afford to make promises!” By doing this, he is preparing to address any potential counterarguments by shaping his speech to combat what the opposition might say.
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