Assessment of the Wastage of Non-Renewable Resource (Water)

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Assessment of the wastage of non-renewable resource (WATER)

Objective

A non-renewable resource is a natural resource which cannot be produced, grown, generated, or used on a scale which can sustain its consumption rate. These resources often exist in a fixed amount, or are consumed much faster than nature can create them. Fossil fuels (such as water, electricity, coal, petroleum and natural gas) and nuclear power (uranium) are examples. In contrast, resources such as timber (when harvested sustainably) or metals (which can be recycled) are considered renewable resources.

In the universe of natural resources, minerals are unique in the sense of their non-renewable profile. Their deposits are finite, either physically or economically, and this implies a special concern about their exploitation, use, consumption, and recycling in a way that could prevent or mitigate their scarcity or unavailability for future generations. The optimal use of resources implies the adoption of a rational classification according to two major factors: geological knowledge and confidence; and the consideration of mining, metallurgical, economic, marketing, legal, environmental, social, and governmental factors (the modifying factors). As a general rule, government action is applied to survey and identify resources, whereas private enterprises concentrate their effort on well-defined reserves.

Introduction

In the universe of natural resources, minerals are unique in the sense of their non-renewable profile. Their deposits are finite, either physically or economically, and this implies a special concern about their exploitation, use, consumption, and recycling in a way that could prevent or mitigate their scarcity or unavailability for future generations. The optimal use of resources implies the adoption of a rational classification according to two major factors: geological knowledge and confidence; and the consideration of mining, metallurgical, economic, marketing, legal, environmental, social, and governmental factors (the modifying factors). As a general rule, government action is applied to survey and identify resources, whereas private enterprises concentrate their effort on well-defined reserves. As technology advances, non-conventional sources of minerals could enter into the marketplace, as shown by current research on seawater, seabed nodules, and ultimately space mining, all of which may occupy some place in the supply of minerals for the future generations.

Methodology

With water wastage in urban areas becoming a cause for concern, environmental activists have stepped up their demand for the reinvention of flush toilet.

At present, a standard flush toilet uses nine to 10 litres of water every time the cistern is pushed down. But, environmentalists dub it a massive wastage of water and argue that flushing does not require more than five-six litres. Hence, the emphasis is on developing flush toilets with minimal usage of water. Giving thrust to establishment of water treatment plants across the country, Sunita said: “Out of the 33,200 million litres of sewage discharged per day in the country, only 4,400 million litres is treated. That means only 13.5 per cent of the country’s total sewage is treated.”

Area of Study

As the globe’s temperature rises and the earth’s weather patterns go haywire, water is quickly becoming a hot topic in the world. Floods are sweeping through new areas, while others are drying out faster than ever. We’ve long had the luxury of holding a cavalier attitude about the water we use, and more often than not that attitude has led us to unnecessary waste and pollution of our water. Water in Life: Water makes up 50 to 90 percent of the weight of living things. Protoplasm is a solution of water and fats, carbohydrates, proteins, and salts. Water transports,...
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