Assessment of Nyc Water vs. Bottled Water

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  • Topic: Manhattan, Croton Aqueduct, Drinking water
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Individual Research Paper

Assessment of New York Tap Water vs. Deer Park Bottled Water

MGMT 650

July 25, 2011

Turnitin Score: %

Purpose:
There have been debates over the years on whether people prefer bottled water over tap water. If you step into an office somewhere in the corner or up against the wall is stacks of large blue containers consisting of water. This debate begins with two sides and often times someone would state that “I never drink tap water” or “Tap water is good for you plus it’s no different from bottled”. The purpose of this study is to determine if 30 random individuals prefer New York Tap Water or Deer Park Bottled Water. The null hypothesis is: “80% the individuals tested will prefer Deer Park Bottled Water over New York Tap Water” (H0: π≥ .80). The alternative hypothesis is: “80% the individuals tested will prefer New York Tap Water over Deer Park Bottled Water” (H1: π≤ .80).

Method:
I purchased a gallon of Deer Park Bottled Water and visited Brooklyn New York where I was able to fill a gallon jug of New York Tap Water. I poured both waters into similar container and marked the New York tap water as “Water A” and the Deer Park bottle water as “Water B” (see Exhibit I). For this study 30 random participants working at Howard University College of Medicine volunteered sample the water to take part in this experiment. Before beginning participants were asked had “had they chewed any mint or peppermint type products within the past hour?” If the participants answer was “No” they were able to participate in the study, if there answer was “Yes” they were exclude or asked to wait an hour before participating. Each participant was given a questionnaire (see Appendix I and Exhibit II). Participants were instructed to complete Q1-“What type of water do you usually drink? (Tap, Spring, Purified or Other)” & Q2- “How many cups of water do you drink a week? (only regular or non-flavored)” before tasting either sample.

Two cups were placed in front of the participant marked “A” and one marked “B” (see Exhibit III). The participants were given the option in tasting either first but were asked that they way 10-20 seconds before tasting the second sample, however they were welcome to taste the samples again should they needed to. After tasting both products the participants were asked to complete Q3-“Which do you prefer water A or water B?” & Q4-“Why do prefer the water you selected in Q3?” of the questionnaire.

Exhibit I

Exhibit II

Exhibit III

Background
Below is a condensed “History of New York City’s Water Supply System” according to to the Department of Environmental Protection at www.nyc.gov:

“Early Manhattan settlers obtained water for domestic purposes from shallow privately-owned wells. In 1677 the first public well was dug in front of the old fort at Bowling Green. In 1776, when the population reached approximately 22,000, a reservoir was constructed on the east side of Broadway between Pearl and White Streets. Water pumped from wells sunk near the Collect Pond, east of the reservoir, and from the pond itself, was distributed through hollow logs laid in the principal streets. In 1800 the Manhattan Company (now The Chase Manhattan Bank, N.A.) sank a well at Reade and Centre Streets, pumped water into reservoir on Chambers Street and distributed it through wooden mains to a portion of the community. In 1830 a tank for fire protection was constructed by the City at 13th Street and Broadway as was filled from a well. The water was distributed through 12-inch cast iron pipes. As the population of the City increased, the well water became polluted and supply was insufficient. The supply was supplemented by cisterns and water drawn from a few springs in upper Manhattan.” “After exploring alternatives for increasing supply, the City decided to impound water from the Croton River, in what is now Westchester County, and to build an aqueduct to carry water...
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