Asperger's Syndrome - Short Essay

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Asperger’s Syndrome is a neurological disorder in which the individual has normal intelligence and language development, but lack some social and communication skills. People with Asperger’s Syndrome dislike change and have obsessive routines that they must follow. They have overly acute senses and observe the world differently than others. However, people with Asperger’s syndrome have a normal IQ and in some cases are very talented in a certain area. Treatment for Asperger’s syndrome is mostly to improve communication and social skills. There is no single treatment for all kids with Asperger’s syndrome, but most of them target the child’s communication skills, obsessive routines and physical lack of coordination. Treatment can include training to gain better skills, therapy and medication. When children with Asperger’s syndrome become adults, many of them are able to work normal jobs and be successful. However, they still might have difficulties interacting in personal relationships and social situations. There are many controversies as to how to classify Asperger’s syndrome. Some feel that it is a type of autism, while others think that it is a learning disability. Many teens with Asperger’s syndrome are bullied and have a difficult time being a ‘normal’ teen. Also during this time, though, they develop a specialty that they are very talented at, and because they are indifferent to what others think of them, they develop it individually. Teenagers with Asperger’s syndrome can often have trouble but as they grow older they fit in better with society.

Kirby, Barbara L. “What is Asperger Syndrome?” O.A.S.I.S. 27 June 2008

“Asperger Syndrome Fact Sheet” National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke 27 June 2008

“The Asperger’s Teen” Your Little Professor 27 June 2008
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