Aspects of Adolescent Egocentrism

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  • Topic: Adolescence, Childhood, Preadolescence
  • Pages : 2 (565 words )
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  • Published : February 24, 2013
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Aspects of adolescence egocentrism As children continue to develop into the school years their view of themselves and others around them begins to change. During early childhood children are usually quite egocentric and often relate to the world around them through their own lens, as they do not easily think in hypothetical terms (Berger, 2008). This phenomenon was coined centration (Berger, 2008). Around the age of seven, early childhood egocentrism takes a shift. It is at this age when children begin to develop a more complex mind and can begin to think abstractly and hypothetically regarding events as well as the feelings and thoughts of others (Berger, 2008). The opinions of others do not affect young children nearly as much as they do seven to eleven year-olds. This is the age of judgment which children begin judging others, judging themselves, and contemplating how others are judging them (Berger, 2008). This phase can be extremely difficult for some children though it also can teach children to behave in a more socially conducive way (Berger, 2008). The complex social bonds and friendships often developed in middle childhood help pave the way for the further social and personal developments which will occur through adolescence (Berger, 2008). The mind of a teenager is much more complex their younger counterpart’s though it remain structurally similar (Artar, 2007). As early and middle childhood children have difficulty foreseeing the experiential view point of others, so do teenagers (Artar, 2007). Teenagers are quite concerned with how others perceive them so are younger children, though because the teenager can engage in formal operational thoughts, they are capable, and more likely, to be empathic toward others in general (Artar, 2007). When it comes to empathy, teenagers are most empathetic and understanding toward their parents and family members and less so toward their peers...
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