Asian Music

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Asian Music

Prepared by the following students of Newland Center for Education: * Cyrille Anne Cabalquinto (Japan)
* Ella Joy Caga (Indonesia)
* Shiena April Yael Daz (South Korea)
* Israel Felicitas (China)
* Daniel Figueroa (Russia)
* Clarissa Joy Llarvez (Thailand)
* Nathale Rose Sabas (Philippines)
* Laika Yee (North Korea)

Table of Contents
Music of Indonesia………………………………………………………………………………..3 Music of Japan…………………………………………………………………………………….11 Music of Russia…………………………………………………………………………………....24 Music of South Korea……………………………………………………………………………..28 Music of the Philippines…………………………………………………………………………..31 Music of Thailand………………………………………………………………………………….35 Music of China……………………………………………………………………………………..38 Music of North Korea………………………………………………………………………………48

Music of Indonesia

Prepared by:
Ella Joy Caga

Music of Indonesia
The music of Indonesia demonstrates its cultural diversity, the local musical creativity, as well as subsequent foreign musical influences that shaped contemporary music scenes of Indonesia. Nearly thousands of Indonesian islands having its own cultural and artistic history and character. This results in hundreds of different forms of music, which often accompanies dance and theater. The music of Java, Sumatra, Bali, Flores and other islands have been documented and recorded, and research by Indonesian and international scholars is ongoing. The music in Indonesia predates historical records; various Native Indonesian tribes often incorporate chants and songs accompanied with music instruments in their rituals. Today the contemporary music of Indonesia is popular in the region, including neighboring countries; Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei.

Musical Instruments
The musical identity of Indonesia as we know it today began as the Bronze Age culture migrated to the Indonesian archipelago in the 2nd-3rd century BC. Traditional musics of Indonesian tribes often use percussion instruments, especially gendang (drums) and gongs. Some of them developed elaborate and distinctive musical instruments, such as sasando string instrument of Rote island, angklung of Sundanese people, and the complex and sophisticated gamelan orchestra of Java and Bali.

* Gamelan
The most popular and famous form of Indonesian music is probably gamelan, an ensemble of tuned percussion instruments that include metallophones, drums, gongs and spike fiddles along with bamboo flutes. Similar ensembles are prevalent throughout Indonesia and Malaysia, however gamelan is originated from Java, Bali, and Lombok. In Central Java, gamelan is intricate and meticulously lay out. The central melody is played on a metallophone in the center of the orchestra, while the front elaboration and d ornamentation on the melody, and, at the back, the gongs slowly punctuate the music. There are two tuning systems. Each Gamelan is tuned to itself, and the intervals between notes on the scale vary between ensembles.

* Kecapisuling
Kecapisuling is a type of instrumental music that is highly improvisational and popular in parts of West Java that employs two instruments, kecapi(zither) and suling (bamboo flute). It is related to tembangsunda.

* Angklung
Angklung is a bamboo musical instrument native to Sundanese people of West Java. It is made out of bamboo tubes attached to a bamboo frame. The tubes are carved so that they have a distinctive resonant pitch when being vibrated. Each angklung only plays one note.

* Kulintang
Kolintang or kulintang is a bronze and wooden percussion instrument native to eastern Indonesia and also The Philippines. In Indonesia it is particularly associated with Minahasa people of North Sulawesi, however it also popular in Maluku and Timor.

* Sasando
Sasando is a plucked string instrument native of Rote island of East Nusa Tenggara. The parts of sasando are a bamboo cylinder surrounded by several wedges where the strings are stretched,...
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